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PILGRIM 




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Dedication 









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Signs are indicative of respective trades: the barber has his striped 
pole, the optician his pair of monster glasses, and the druggist a huge 
mortar and pestle. At Plymouth High School Mr. Roland Holmes "edits" 
the yearbook. 

We like to believe that this book is the result of our work and effort, 
but we know full well that it would never become a reality without Mr. 
Holmes' guiding hand and constant encouragement. It is to him we dedicate 
this PILGRIM, this "sign" which gives to those who pass by quickly some 
idea of the activities which are ours. 

This record of our school life will be carefully treasured by all of us. 
But more important still are the many "signs" which Mr. Holmes has given 
us as we journeyed through the years. These most people do not see 
because they do not hang before a shop for all to see, but are hung securely 
inside the hearts of us all to whom he means so much. 

We often stop to think how much we owe Mr. Holmes, and how much 
we depend upon him. The many pupils gathered around his desk prove 
how great a part he plays in our lives. As adviser for the PILGRIM, he 
sometimes has to be firm, but we know that it is his wise guidance that 
aids us to our success. He helps us to be more self-reliant, more able to 
work with others, and better equipped for the future. We shall remember 
the personal interest he has taken in every one of us, and the time he has 
given freely. We shall remember and cherish his kindness, his sense of 
humor, and his firm guidance through troubled waters. In gratitude we 
fondly dedicate our PILGRIM to Mr. Roland Holmes. 

K. S. E. 



The Principal Speaks 



The French have a proverb which translates roughly as follows: It 
is easy to be wise for others, but it is not easy to be wise for one's self. 
I suppose we might express that more pungently in our own idiom: — 
We find it easy to tell another man how to run his business although we 
may not know how to mind our own. 

And in present-day life because the government through relief pro- 
grams, social security, school lunch programs, and subsidies to farmers, 
milk producers, shipbuilders, air-line operators, etc., provides for us so 
many of the things which formerly we expected to provide for ourselves, 
our self-reliance is weakened and our much-vaunted spirit of independence 
considerably diluted. All too many our people are quite contentedly con- 
ditioning themselves to accepting government handouts; they not only 
are unable to mind their own business, they don't even seem to want to. 

And yet every boy possessed of a spark of manhood wants to stand 
on his own feet — and the same can be said of every self-respecting girl. 
All except the weaklings want to stand erect, beholden to no one for favors. 

What protection then is there against this insidious weakening of 
our national character ? Are we to turn into a race of "chiselers"? Can we 
stand up before any self-respecting nation — even the Russians — and 
take pride in our achievements when underlying it all lies the rot — and 
we know it — of the cheap practices that the weak-willed, slippery-minded, 
morally blind, shyly dishonest have worked out to take advantage of the 
social legislation set up to aid and protect the truly unfortunate? (No 
one can have any serious quarrel with the intent of this legislation — but 
all of us must guard against the abuses it makes possible.) And it is the 
insidious temptation within ourselves that I'm talking about — not what 
someone else does, but what you or I may do. For the ultimate bulwark 
of all law is the conscience of the individual. 

And so it is that conscience becomes the only real protection against 
national decay. We become a race of "chiselers" only if you and I and our 
friends stoop to "chiseling." As a people we lose our self-reliance, our 
typically American spirit of independence, when you and I seek in govern- 
ment hand-outs those things which we should by our own work supply 
for ourselves. 

A decent pride, an honest self-respect, can grow only out of a good 
conscience, and a decent nation evolves only from decent citizens. 

EDGAR J. MONGAN 



PILGRIM STAFF 



Editor-in-chief — Karin S. Engstrom 

Junior Assistant Editor — Barbara Warnsman 

Sophomore Assistant Editor — Claire Vancini 

Business Staff — Roger Weaver, Manager 

Philip Canevazzi, Asst. Manager; James Goodwin, Christopher Hussey, 
Patricia Brady, Philip Sherman, Marie Hasz, Peter Miller, Robert 
Miskelly 

Art Staff — Joyce Brenner, Editor 

John Ledo, Elizabeth Bobb, Jeanette Brenner, Robert Kuhn 

Photography Staff — Cecelia Lillich, Editor 

Carol Melahoures, Asst.; Sally Arons, Mary Bradley 

School News — Janice Kingman 

Senior Statistics — Edward Borgatti, Editor 

John Vancini, Jacqueline Weston, Lorraine Freitas 

Senior Features — Carol Connelly, Editor 
Claire Connelly, June Wood, Marie Hasz 

Boys' Sports Editor — Ira Carlin 

Girls' Sports Editor — Audrey Verkade 

French Editor — Nancy Maloni 

Latin Editor — Wallace Crowell 

Science-Math Editor — Charles Branagan 

Typists — Patricia Gellar, Delores Almeida, Joyce Pederzini, Elizabeth 
Lemieux 



With Stars In Our Eyes 

The theatre is deserted for another summer and stands waiting for the 
new cast that will take the leading roles in the fall. 

It's hard to realize that our P. H. S. days have run out — three years 
rilled with sun and shadows, laughter and tears, work and play — the 
little things, after all — the understanding smile, the helping friendships 
in times of trouble, the friendly advice — all cast against remembered 
backgrounds. Thus graduation day rings down the final curtain for the 
class of '54 — with smiles for new adventures ahead, smiles and tears 
for friends and memories left behind. 

These props left behind lie waiting through the summer for the 
new cast. But there are other legacies there, too, just as real, even if not 
as easily described. They are all the goodwill, all the hopes for success, and 
all the affection that those former actors and actresses have left for the 
ones that come back to that deserted theatre in the fall. 

Plymouth High School takes pleasure in reviewing a drama which 
portrays the daily life, activities and achievements of a year. We have all 
taken part in this drama, and we feel that somehow we have gained from 
it something of great value, that we have grown stronger and better 
because of it. Therefore, we take deepest pride in presenting to you the 
1954 PILGRIM. 

KARIN S. ENGSTROM 

Editor-in-Chief 






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CLASS OFFICERS 



THE STARS 




IRA CARLIN 

Popularity and sportsmanship 
helped Ira to achieve the office 
of class president. He has served 
for two years on the Student 
Activities Society, and is a mem- 
ber of the Pilgrim Staff. As a 
husky football star we will long 
remember "Babe," who is always 
willing to help us in any way. 




FRANCIS MERRITT 

Butch, the shy blonde with a 
crew cut and pleasant person- 
ality, has served as vice-presi- 
dent for two years. One of the 
first five, he helped our basket- 
ball team to victory this year. 
Besides that "Butch" loves base- 
ball and is our star pitcher. A 
true sport, he deserves the hon- 
ors we have bestowed upon him. 





JOHN VANCINI 

A friendly smile combined 
with a striking personality 
helped "Johnny" to the office of 
class treasurer. He has worked 
faithfully for the S. A. S. and 
Pilgrim and collected for the 
Hanson T.V. Fund. Last year he 
was elected Vice-President of the 
S. A. S. and this year is a mem- 
ber of the honor group. "Johnny" 
also has been a credit to our 
basketball and track teams. 



MARILYN ROSSI 

A pleasant personality with 
the ability to do almost any- 
thing has given Marilyn her po- 
sition this year as well as the 
last two years. "Mena" is an 
avid sports fan and is al- 
ways around to cheer her team 
to victory. This year our little 
"Mena" was chosen "Best Girl 
Citizen" as well as a member of 
both the Honor Group and the 
Honor Society. 




KATHERINE ALEXANDER 

"Thy Smile Becomes Thee Well" 
"Tinny" — Movie mad — she, 
Jeanette and Bette — passion for 
pizza — Colonial customer — Oh, 
to get the car — never without 
a smile — at the head of our 
class (alphabetically) — can't help 
talking — passion for good clothes 
— curvaceous and vivacious — 
surprised look — clerk at the 
Five and Ten — a good looker. 



SALLY ARONS 

"In Class, Quite Mute; 

Alone, Most Garrulous" 

"Sal" — always so dreamy-eyed 

— hopes to make Syracuse — 
seen with Marilyn — she has a 
temper — "Cut it out" — that kid 
brother — always has the latest 
news — "Dimples" — good cook 

— a teaser — "Come on, huh?" 

— in a fog — talkative — likes 
bowling — a shutterbug — sum- 
mer beaus — gab session in bi- 
ology — Nunez fan. 




DOLORES ALMEIDA 

"Alive in The Crowd of Jollity" 
"Dolly" — Salem State Teachers 

— swell sense of humor — I'm 
busy — Oh, that fifth period 
study! — seen trying to make 
Sylvia laugh — one of the 7:25 
Kids — "That's terrific!" — our 
energetic Pilgrim typist — likes 
all sports — seen studying — those 
curls — friendly — very intelligent 

— supervising for Mr. Holmes in 
103 — future teacher at P. H. S. 

— likes to sing. 





PAUL BARATTA 

"A Gentleman Who Loves to 

Hear Himself Talk" 
"Chev" — he and his crazy trum- 
pet — "Dig me five" — Town 
Brook Service Station — Dick, 
Rod and the men — "I can out- 
race you" — sticks up for his 
Corsairs — "got a comb?" — writes 
a lot for Mr. Nunez — argumen- 
tative — never worries — burning 
up our highways — "No, no." 



GEORGE ANDERSON 

"I Am Monarch Of All I Survey" 
"Andy" — Seen with jeep in 
Pembroke — his brothers (Sid 
and Freck) — class sleeper — 
dynamic quarterback of P. H. S. 
— "What happened?" — one of 
the Hogan boys — future All 
Amerian at N. D. or H. C. — Mr. 
Haskell's pal — ladies' idol — 
Reynolds done him in — every- 
body loves Saturday night — 
summer camp — never without a 
laugh. 





BETTY BARBOZA 

"Trouble Is Small, Fun Is Great, 

Life Is Beautiful" 
"Betty" — marriage — future nurse 
—record collector — Mary and 
she — "Crazy" — seen at Barros 
Lounge— tall and slim! — at Jim's 
fried chicken lover — her secret 
desire is a boy — culinary artist 

— real hep — pleasant disposition 

— ban popular music — usually 
with Mary and the gang. 




GEORGE ARNOLD 

"His Actions Speak Louder 

Than My Pen" 

"Satch" — "That's how the ball 

bounces" — mechanical engineer 

—that long stride — likes to laugh 

— our front running half miler 

— Hendries Ice Cream — North- 
eastern — pigskin end — that crew 
cut — our next millionaire scien- 
tist — informality is best — "Yea" 

— everyone's friend — eating ice 
cream. 



DAVID BARNES 

"Though All Is Still, 
There Is Mischief Afoot" 
"Dave" — train crazy — confirmed 
bachelor — Where there's a will, 
there's a way — that hobby of 
his! — not much for words — 
Plympton's future mayor — a 
real crazy crew cut — Marines 
— Mrs. Bagnall's pet — it's a long 
walk home — handsome — some- 
what sleepy. 





DENNIS BARRETT 

"An Athlete On The Field, 

A Sport At Heart" 

"Sid" — one of the Hogan boys 

— senior clown, but oh, so shy 

— "I didn't mean it!" — basket- 
ball star — future P. H. S. coach 

— "For Pete's sake" — wrestling 
with Freck — a H. A. fan — those 
long set shots — also a football 
star — oh, to relax — our Dra- 
matic Club crooner. 



ELIZABETH BOBB 

"Rich With The Spoils 
Of Nature" 
"Bette" — oh, to own a Caddy — 
Janice — "Are you beautiful?" 
vivacious cheerleader — swell 
dresser — oh, that poodle ! — 
Colonial Restaurant — flirtatious 
— found in Pilgrim Drug — why 
so peppy? — "You're late. Get 
a slip" — MEN — that minstrel 
show dance ! ! ! — Little Pond — 
talented singer and dancer — a 
ball of fun and mirth. 




NANCY BARTLETT 

"The Magic Of A Pretty Face" 
"Nan" — we envy her clothes 

— "Sa" — Ann, Dotty and Sandy 

— tall, blond, and beautiful — 
what's the Navy got, Nan? — in- 
fectious smile — record fan — 
sincere — that beauty parlor look 

— a commercial course — Jabez 
Cornerite — "I keep waiting for 
the mailman" — a friendly greet- 
ing for everyone. 





EDWARD BORGATTI 

"The Halls Will Echo His 
Laughter Long After 
Graduation Day" 
"Spaghetti" — "Bogart" — teasing 
girls — loud shirts — contagious 
smile — class president twice — 
"Hi, Honey" — happy bachelor 

— gets "A" marks — practical 
joker — hot driver — bow ties — 
always eating — roaming Romeo 

— "That's what she said!" — dy- 
namic speaker — future teacher 

— Camp Wing — classy dresser 

— Salem State Teachers — intra- 
mural ace. 



DONNA BARUFALDI 

"The Mirth And Fun 
Grew Fast and Furious" 
"D. B." — our athletic senior — 
B. U. Sargent College of Phys. 
Ed. — she, Sal and the Olds — 
Leland's worker — "I don't know 
if I can have the car" — always 
cracking jokes — that D. A. coif- 
fure — youthful Babe Zaharius 
— "Garibaldi" — beautiful bach- 
elorette — future gym coach — 
Miss Knight's best girl Softball 
star. 





GAIL BOGATTI 

"As Happy As The Day Is Long" 
"Gay" — with the Bradford Street 
gals — always babysitting for her 
sisters and brothers — very sin- 
cere — her uncle Skinny — what 
a beautiful report card! — a cin- 
ema fan — pacifying patients on 
Pill Hill — likes all sports — fu- 
ture nurse? — basketball is the 
greatest! — curly hair and pearly 
teeth — spaghetti and meatballs 
— "Get that stuff out of my 
locker!" 




BEVERLY BLACK 

"No Man (or girl) Can Be Wise 
On An Empty Stomach" 

"Bev" — future WAF — Audrey 
and she — oh, to chew gum in 
Mrs. Gardner's class! — a hep 
square - dancer — with a ready 
smile — pastime: eating, sleeping, 
and eating again — also digs 
skating — the wide blue yonder 
— Mrs. Urann's tap line — petite 
but oh, so cute. 



NORMAN BOUDREAU 

"A Fake Is A Very 
Serious Thing" 
"Normie" — found at A&P — a 
basketball fanatic — "What ?" — 
always has a date — with "Babe" 
shooting baskets — steak and 
French fries — gals in Quincy — 
"Bub" — future driver in Sea 
Bees — with Cringo, Babe, and 
another Babe — goes for Fords 
— future groom. 





CHARLES BRANAGAN 

"Toil," Says The Poor Cob, 

"Is A Sign Of Fame" 

"Charlie" — Cooper's Soda Jerk 

— Billy Worm and Jim Dunlap 

— Kingston lover — those Trig 
tests! — Mr. Packard's protege? 

— that 111' Austin — efficient pun- 
ster — future pill - roller — likes 
hunting and golfing — suave dres- 
ser — goes for "crazy" comics — 



"Help you, sir'.' 



young girls- 



also a chemist and physicist — 
another Plymouth Beacher — 
"Let's went." 



CHRISTINE BRIGIDA 

"Vim, Vigor, And Vitality" 
"Chris" — Burdett — famous bas- 
ketball guard — always leaves 
us laughing — shy smile — ef- 
ficiency plus — brains — at 
Smith's store — Honor Group 
workhorse — industrious — found 
in the office — likes swimming 

— older men — wonderful per- 
sonality — seen with Dolly — oh, 
those details — rush, rush, rush 

— Peter Zenger fan. 




JEANETTE BRENNER 

"I've Taken My Fun Where 
I've Found It" 
"Jet" — future artist — seen in a 
beachwagon — our peppy cheer- 
ing captain — laughing — "Come 
on, now" — oh, to be able to 
draw as she does — industry plus 
— daydreams — with the North 
Plymouth gals — that summer 
camp — 3 years an S. A. S.'er — 
dance decorations — "Numbah 
pleez" — laughs while talking. 





BARBARA BUMPUS 

"There Are Far Better 

Things Ahead" 

"Barb" — aches for the Golden 

West — at South Carver P. O. 

— "If you say so" — perched on 
a hoss — real gone personality 

— digs all music — hoping for a 
ring (not on the telephone) — 
baseball — desire: smash home- 
lessons — radio rates with her — 
please repeat, Miss Bumpus. 



JOYCE BRENNER 

"Tis Good To Live and Learn" 
"Joy" — another talented artist 

— oh, to pass a good English 
test! — scientifically minded, too 

— future commercial artist — 
Pilgrim art editor — RISD or 
Purdue — a certain Worcester 
Poly guy — our Science Fair 
champ — brainy, too — found go- 
ing to Brown with Mr. Young 

— Mr. Wilson's favorite girl — 
a "Bangy" hairdo. 





JAMES BURT 

"The More You Know Him, 
The Better You Like Him" 
"Jimmy" — Sonny and a '49 
Nash — "How about that ?" — 
Jim's — to own a jeep! — Primo's 
helper — a great hunter and 
fisher — quiet, but not too! — 
with Northrup at George's — 
easygoing and friendly — plane 
spotter — long walk to school, 
ha! — deep voice — beautiful sis. 




BETTEMAE BREWER 

"Always A Merry Smile 
And A Happy Mood" 
"Betts" — horseback riding — New 
York City can expect her — long 
hair — laughing always — Mar- 
gie — future secretary — office 
assistant — strolling through town 
with Margie — that wide-eyed 
smile — not a worry in the world 
— Chiltonville-ite — roller skat- 
ing queen — friendly horses make 
good friends. 



JEANETTE BURT 

"Eyes That Speak In 
Friendly Tones" 
"Jeannie" — "Number pleez" — 
so neat — Tassy's with Edie — 
sterling steno — always asks why 
— loves roller skating — red 
dungarees — green eyes — "Stop 
it" — a warm, radiant friendli- 
ness — a sight for sore eyes — 
"We'll be good, Mr. Holmes" — 
a string of pearls — doing sten- 
ography — "Is that so?" — such 
poise — teasing a junior boy. 





BEVERLY BUSI 

"Do Today's Work Well And 
Not Bother About Tomorrow" 
"Bev" — can be found in Carver 
— nice kid — favorite subject is 
Bus. Ec. — another pizza kid — 
swell personality — "Hi, ya!" — 
very talkative — crazy gal — 
always keeping Jackie out of 
trouble — picture her as a nurse — 
well groomed — very pleasant 
smile. 



LOUIS CECCO 

"Money Isn't Happiness, 
Make Your Life Work 
That Which You Like" 
"Jerry" — "Zeke" can be found 
around Boston — favorite sub- 
ject . . band — another pizza fella 

— Bop — "I dig you the most" 

— crazy guy — full of jokes — 
picture him playing his horn in 
the Army — a well - protected 
D. A. — with Monty and Duke — 
smash hit at our Hobo Hop. 




LOUIS CAPPELLA 

"Calmness Is Not Always The 
Attribute Of Innocence" 
"Louie" — Mr. Packard's pet — 
baseball star — girls? — we'll leave 
it to you! — good looking — he 
and the boys — quarterback — a 
beard — always with a joke — a 
lady killer — seen driving a 
truck — "OK youse guys" — hear 
him laughing — sleeves rolled 
up — "Now I have some nice 
cards here ..." 





CAROL CONNELLY 

"Her Fiery Hair Reveals Her 
Very Nature" 
"Red" — college penpals — Ber- 
muda shorts — likes opera and 
longhair music — dynamic brain 

— "Don't you dare" — sophisti- 
cated — studious — seen with Adele 

— temper — those knee socks — 
tall, talkative type — Leland's — 
actually digs Latin! — man, those 
freckles — intelligent boys — 
laughing — at the library — with 
Claire and at Chuzzy's parties. 



IRA CARLIN 

"Many A Treasure Besides Ali 
Baba's Is Unlocked With A 

Verbal Key" 
"Choo Choo" — rugged #39 — 
heaves the shot put — highest hon- 
ors — future politico — oratorical 
winner — great personality — gets 
the Physics blues — the class 
workhorse — a true gentleman 

— "Me neither" — soph redheads 

— none finer — our President — 
super salesman — likes NROTC 

— witty — rolled up sleeves — 
some Ivy League College — likes 
laughing and girls. 





CLAIRE CONNELLY 

"Quiet Friendliness With 

Deep Sincerity" 

Secretarial school — at Leland's 

— goes for Ernie's pizza — col- 
lege football fan — likes trig 
class? — mail for a certain male 

— doesn't dig 3D — "Gee, I don't 
know" — would like a Mercury 
convertible — V2 of a set of 
twins — life of the party — "Ya." 





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RONALD CATON 

"I Know A Dream 
Worth Two Of That" 
"Chocolate" — "Joe Teves" — a 
9th grader? — with Scag and 
Van — a permanent grin — chalk 
duels with Jack in psych. — base- 
ball fan — good sport — class- 
room blues — down with ties — 
mmm, that Italian food — cruis- 
ing with the "heap" — likes 
young babes, grade 9 say? — 
murders the English language. 



LOUIS CORREIA 

"Always Leave Them Laughing 

When You Say Good-By" 
"Cringo" — always laughing — fu- 
ture Mayor of South Carver — 
always singing — teacher's de- 
light — man, can he jitterbug! — 
talkative and friendly — girls — 
our hustling left end — calls 
everyone Mr. — "I guess so, 
man!" — never, never gets angry 
— intramurals star — permanent 
grin — flashily dressed. 





BEATRICE COSTA 

"I Live In Hopes Of 
Better Days!" 
"Bea" — always in the movies — 
favorite subject is sewing — al- 
ways talking with Ronnie C. — 
prefers steak — favorite topic? 
Mrs. Kingman — one of the 
North Plymouth Pips — loves to 
travel — stock car racing — "Oh, 
come on" — her pop"s Plymouth 
— with Sylvia — against boxing. 



JAMES DUNLAP 

"Teasing Is A Great Art" 
"Jim" — his '47 Kaiser — home 
arts — just hates girls? Ha! — 
— loves banana splits — "Oh, my 
gosh" — likes hunting — guns — 
oh, to own a '54 Mercury con- 
vertible — future ranch in Ken- 
tucky — fast man — wants 5 min- 
ute classes and 10 minute pas- 
sing periods — moustache — a cute 
little junior girl — Gellar and 
Jack. 




WALLACE CROWELL 

"A Good Mixture Of All Things" 
"Wally" — likes figures (mathe- 
matical, etc.) — cuts a smooth 
tu% — DeMolay interest — just - 
combed all day — remembers 
"Sandy" — Ira's pal — quiet but 
efficient — future accountant — 
science bug — intelligent — our 
world traveler — at Parson's — 
"Yes, let's" — still fighting solid 
geom — Owens' bumper. 





JAMES DYKEMAN 

"Life Is Nothing Without Music" 
"Jim" — always with Zeke — real 
jazzy — favorite subject is H. A. 

— craves pizza — full of the 
devil — loves music — nice per- 
sonality — picture him as Les 
Brown's right-hand man — al- 
ways talking — Air Force bound 

— "Duke" — easy come, easy go 

— a lovely hairdo — good dancer 

— smooth dresser. 



ALICE DAVID 

"Good Things Come In 

Small Packages" 

"Al" — to cross the country — 

North Plymouth gal — "I forgot" 

— Tassy's — she likes to paint — 
a relation in Woolworth's? — mad 
over music — "Really" — isn't 
really too quiet — likes dancing 

— with Jane and Gaye — a ready 
smile — waiting for a bus — 
slacks — our dance hustler — 
also has problems — in Democ- 
racy, that is. 





SANDRA EASTMAN 

"Her Disposition Is As Sunny 
As Her Hair" 
"Sandy" — horses, hot rods, and 
hunting — Carla, Dot, Nancy — 
broiled lobster at the Bourne 
Mill — shhh — she wants to be a 
modern dancer — BRIDGE- 
WATER — that sugary smile — 
easy to hear — name it, she's 
done it — "Raise the coffin and 
smother it with onions" — brown 
bread — a Nunez fan. 




JEAN DREW 

"I Only Know That Summer 
Sang In Me" 
"Jeannie" — 'Tassy's holds a fas- 
cination — she'll make a wonder- 
ful nurse — "Oh, my land of 
stars!" — who said that? — pizza 

— who's ring does she wear? — 
collecting pictures — "Oh, no!" 

— sense of humor — with sis — 
a doll, a real doll — such fun 
with Stu — at all our athletic 
events. 



MARY ELDRIDGE 

"Bright Golden Hair 
On A Mistress Fair" 
"Elly" — a bowling gal — tele- 
phone operator — "My word!" — 
talking with Claire — our cran- 
berry queen — does she ever 
stop laughing? — wants to see 
Paris — likes dancing — she hears 
wedding bells — "Hey, Toddy" — 
tall, beautiful, gorgeous, pretty, 
refreshing; that's her. 





KARIN ENGSTROM 

"I Came To The Crossroads 
And Went Both Ways" 
"Sam" — hoping for Wellesley — 
Yacht Club — knee socks — 
refugee from Virginia — Beach 
Club parties — picture her in 
Europe — her Willys — Pilgrim 
editor meant a lot of aspirins — 
industrious — "I even did my 
Trig" — "Oh, golly" — knitting a 
sweater — "My daddy got a new 
car" — "go home" — black coffee 
— at Jane's. 



RONALD FERIOLI 

"Here Is A Man Whom 
We All Envy" 
"Ronnie" — attends Hogan's Uni- 
versity — handsome — favorite 
subject: radio — craves pizza — 
Girls! — crazy guy- — "What a 
pip" — fast worker — headed for 
Chicago — full of jokes — ex- 
perienced meatcutter — another 
hoopster — "There goes the fen- 
der." — gets the beautiful girls — 
those deep brown optics — Baby 
Rose. 




DONALD FANTONI 

"Enjoy Today, Tomorrow 
May Never Come" 
"Don" — student at Hogan's — 
our inspirational pigskin cap- 
tain—tackled TV. — likes the 
fair sex — the athletic type — 
sleeping and eating — best all- 
round-football, basketball, 
baseball; he can't be beat — Sid, 
Freck, and George — Holbrook's 
pal — those blue and white 
sweaters — a dreamy dancer — 
H. A. class-crooner. 











DERIL FERNALD 

"An Angelic Face But A 
Mischievous Mind" 
"Curley" — Kingston Drive-in — 
"Ya, no kidding." — his '39 Chevie 
heap — wants a beard — oh, so 
cute (the gals say) — baseball 
hero — Plympton man — " How 
much ya wanna bet?" — study 
hall terror — who is his girl? — 
a grin so wide he nearly swal- 
lows his nose — with Joe and 
Nick — one-armed driver- — "Med- 
win." 



RONALD FANTONI 

"There Is Mischief In 
His Glance" 
"Ronnie" — seen at Hogan's — 
"Is that right ?" — homelesson 
hater — a certain sophomore red- 
head — Carlo's friend — wants to 
be a millionaire — bashful grin 
— H. A. enthusiast — our husky 
left guard (#47)— future ad- 
miral — no diets for him — at 
locker 162 — driving with the 
left hand. 





MARY FONTES 

"True To Our Fellow Humans" 
"Sister"— pastime: spinning plat- 
ters — picture her a nurse — short 
on speech — with Betty — craves 
dancing, food, music, and fun — 
Carver cutie — at Hyannis Hos- 
pital — seen smiling — temper, 
temper — seen at cinema, or else 
dancing — short on speech. 



\ . 







PAUL FERAZZI 

"The Earnest Manner Of An 
Upright Man" 
"Joe Football" — hustling S. A. S. 
President — willing dance worker 
— "You wanna?" — to Chicago 
School of Meatcutting — Home 
Arts lover — baked a cookie in 
his pocket — everyone's pal — 
secret love? — suave dresser — 
Rogers' store — sometimes seen 
at Warren Avenue — a pigskin 
star — that "never quit" spirit. 



FRANK FORMICA 

"Swiftness is the Law 
of Survival" 
"Foo" — seen at Skippy's — Hot 
rod — wants the fastest boat in 
town — peeved by female driv- 
ers — heavy coffee drinker — 
cars his hobby — '38 Ford — 
man, that crew cut! — future 
race king — that distinguished 
look — purple car — with several 
cute girls. 





GAYE FRACCALOSSI 

"The Friendly Manner 

Of A Carefree Soul" 

"Gaye" — eating and clothes 

shopping — Gene Nelson admirer 

— friendly and good-natured — 
"Gee whiz" — Woolworth's — talk- 
ing — enjoyed senior year — knits 

— "Hey, Jane!" — goes for Ital- 
ian cooking — one of the North 
Plymouth gals — always teased 
by Bobby — a WORL listener. 



DONALD GELLAR 

"To Eat, To Drink, 
And To Be Merry" 
"Don" — U.S. A. F. — to tour the 
U. S. in '54 Merc, convertible — 
fishing and figures — pizza at 
Tassy's and Jim's — "Why can't 
we have coke in the water foun- 
tains?" — he, Dunlap, and Han- 
son — Manomet man — another 
bowler — nice hair-do — seen en- 
joying life — likes cars, cars, 
cars. 




ROBERT FRACCALOSSI 

"Perseverance Leads To Victory" 
"Freck" — student at Hogan's 
University — favorite subject: 
H. A. — Mr. Touchdown, P. H. S. 
■ — All American — "Oh, gee!" — 
future P. H. S. gym coach — 
smiles all the time — future 
fighting Marine — our hoop cap- 
tain — "Cut it out, Sid" — that 
heap — wrestles with Fran — the 
hard luck kid — selling eggs — 
the mink boys. 





PATRICIA GELLAR 

"Getting Some Fun Out of Life" 
"Pat" — roller - skater — picture 
her married to a millionaire — 
Claire and Mary — "Better you 
than me" — seen most at the 
movies — dance demon — day- 
dreamer — passing notes in class 

— doesn't talk much — Tele- 
phone Company — a secret idol 

— "I don't know" — lost in a 
fog. 



LORRAINE FREITAS 

"Still Waters Run Deep" 
"Laurie" — Jane, Pat, and Joyce 

— picture her with a family — 
record collector — pizza (another 
one??)— "Oh, well, that's life!" 

— no nursing ? — marriage for 
this gal — at the Colonial — a 
poet — "I'll be darned" — at 
every football frolic — there's a 
Ford in her future — tired look 
one moment, a firecracker the 
next — likes jokes. 





JOHN GHIDONI 

"He Greets You With A Smile" 
"Johnny" — "Hey Cuz" — football 
hero — handsome and quiet — 
pizza — with Vic and the others 
from "God's Country" — always 
good natured — at the Poultry 
Farm — "Prove it" — at R. M.'s 
— "Chicken" — goes for jokes — 
likes girl (singular) — "I'm con- 
fused" — make it work out. 




DONALD FREYERMUTH 

"No One Ever Died 
Of Laughter" 
"Don" — going toward Carver — 
likes hunting — "Lord, I'se com- 
ing" — full of fun — the perfect 
lover — a joker in psych — neat 
dresser — talkative — likes tink- 
ering with cars and is mechan- 
ically minded — "Fill her up?" 
— at Whitehorse and Tony's — 
Tod — likes doing homework . . 
ha! 



PATRICIA GIBBS 

"Happiness Takes 
No Account Of Time" 
"Patti" — Bourne Mill— "What 
a riot " — Maritime Academy 
ship — suave swimmer — future 
hairdresser — tall and slim — 
Cedarville's favorite — early 
morning bus ride — quiet in 
class? — those horn rims — a rol- 
ler skater also — likes every- 
thing, especially Jack — Wool- 
worth's — "I'll say" — Jane, Lor- 
raine, and Margie. 






*0* <c 




m a 



ROLAND GIBBS 

"Whatever Is Worth Doing 
Is Worth Doing Well" 
"Gibbie" — Buzzards Bay and 
Bourne — future President of 
R. C. A. Victor — grilled cheese 
and coffee — he and Andy — tem- 
perament of a true artist — "Oh, 
I wouldn't say that." — bachel- 
orhood, here he comes — P. H. S. 
brain — with a smile — beautiful 
wavy locks — sometimes teasing 
— always grinning. 



JOANNE GOODWIN 

"A Maid Pretty To Walk With, 

And Bright To Talk With" 
"Jo" — oh, those curls — daddy's 
favorite golfer — her desire's a 
secret! — "Holy Mackerel!" — 
Oldsmobile fancier — winter down 
South — S. A. S. worker — it's tee 
time — Mary Lou — "Golly" — that 
accent sends ya — smooth dancer 
— someone in Jersey? — our fav- 
orite Marlene Bauer — brainy 
also — most famous class member. 




JOYCE GIVEN 

"If It Be Love Indeed 
Tell Me How Much" 
"Joe" — Reis home — carrots and 
cabbage — Marines — "Hey, can 
you come down my house?" — 
listen to her tell those jokes! — 
she and Judy — cute blond — at 
the bowling alleys — working — 
"No" — quiet personality — pic- 
ture her as a marine — on the Post 
Office steps — working. 





JEAN GRENNELL 

"Jeannie With The 
Light Brown Hair" 
"Jeannie" — capers with the car 
— Manomet lover? — to work in 
an office — "Dad, give me the 
keys to the car?" — craves a 
Cadillac — so good - natured — 
intellectual type — seen mostly 
studying (well, sometimes, may- 
be i — likes good company — likes 
colorful clothes. 



RONALD GLOYD 

"The Spirit Is Indeed Willing" 
"Ronnie" — strong silent type — 
with Babe and Linky — that 
tired look — card playing and 
pool shark — "Never gamble" — 
future Air Force Officer and a 
billionaire — looks at T. V. — 
eating, sleeping, more eating — 
homework on a pool table — 
usually daydreaming — flashy 
specs — yawning — sharp shirts. 





ANN GUIDOBONI 

"One Bloom Of Health And 
Happiness Is Necessary For 
Good Living" 
She and Joyce — wants to con- 
quer the moon — no school teach- 
ing for this kid — boys in gen- 
eral — "Butch" — Mass. U. — jail 
bait — speak up, Ann — between 
the hospital and the Obery 
Height's "Hotel" — S. A. — pro- 
vocative smile — Forum For Liv- 
ing contest winner — likes Eng- 
lish details. 




JAMES GOODWIN 

"Music Is The Thing Of The 
World That I Love Most" 
"Jay" — oh, that Weaver ! — his- 
tory major? — we can see 
him at Bridgewater, or is it 
Mass. State? — "Is that right?" 

— he and Bernie — Cooper's for 
coffee — our organist — so jovial 

— likes the dentist — well- 
dressed — orator — likes discus- 
sion club at Leland's with Roga 

— "Jay, turn around," says J. 
Nunez. 



JANE GUNTHER 

"So Vast Is Art, I Cannot 
Comprehend Its Many Wonders" 
"Jinny" — oh, that turkey stuf- 
fing — art school — picture her 
in the art gallery — head seam- 
stress — "Yup, sure" — she and 
Pat like football players — 
blushes — those flashy specs — 
"Number pleez" — humorous and 
likeable — tennis — likes spa- 
ghetti but not pizza. 





ROBERT GUNTHER 

"A Friend Among Strangers" 
"Bob" — hobby? chasing fires — 
enjoys life — future fire chief — 
seen talking his head off — "Ok, 
dad" — seen looking at babes — 
anchors aweigh — out Kingston 
a . lot — Tassy's — fight fan — at 
the alleys mucho — Thissell — 
likes Duxbury — muscle bound 
— roll down those sleeves. 



MARIE HASZ 

"The Perfect Scholar Is She" 
Picture her flying a plane — 
Cornell U. ? — oh, that French 
pronunciation — pet raccoons — 
photography — our Science Fair 
honors winner — genuinely in- 
terested in everything — in 101 

— square dance bug — ambition: 
beat trig — burning for learning 

— singer by def — "I'm ashamed 
of you" — perfect student — 
Ruffus ran away. 




KATHERINE HACKING 

"A Proper Mixture Of 
Squeals And Groans" 
" Kay " — Miss Downey's pet 
peeve? — that beautiful com- 
plexion — jingle bells — future 
airline hostess — oh, to own a 
red Ford convertible — jazz 
— "Crazy" — "Hi!! What's hap- 
pening?" — Carver belle — some- 
one with Uncle Sam? — Little 
Pond on summer nights. 








MILDRED HERRIES 

"Secret, And Self-Contained, 
And Solitary As An Oyster" 
"Millie" — California, here she 
comes! — future secretary — 
doesn't say much at all — listen: 
those horn rims — watching T.V. 
— also a book worm — just loves 
school — sweet tooth — in the 
Boot Pond stix — against Am. 
History — with Sylvia — laughs 
while talking. 



JOHN HANSON 

"No Medicine Can Provide 
A Better Disposition" 
"Tack" — hunter superb — U. S. 
Air Force — girls? — oh, brother! 
— "What do you say. kid?" — 
baseball bug — a cute soph — not 
much for words — handsome 
Jack — a lady killer — all around 
athlete — Gellar and Jim — bowl- 
ing whiz — Ted Williams type. 





SYLVIA HOLMES 

"Little Packages Often Hold 
Rare Gems" 
"Sibby" — culinary queen — 
Hawaii bound, she hopes — "I 
guess so" — to travel — bowling is 
the essence of a good figure — 
peddling a bike — quiet doll — 
"Never mind" — seen with Bea 
C. — looking for a good-paying 
job — don't crack your knuckles 
— radio listener. 




ANN HARLOW 

"Efficiency Is Skill, And She 

Is Most Skillful" 

"GeeGee" — seen most with Celia 

— wants to own her own car — 
artistic streak — "Yee Gods!"- — 
"Pass the salt, please." — acad- 
emy of hairdressing — in Smith's 

— friendly and good natured — 
tall, trim blondie — certain men 

— commonly called "Brooks." 



CELIA HOWE 

"A Rare Compound Of Frolic 
And Fun" 
"Cela" — talk, talk, and more 
talk — Carver is IT — oh, to 
chew gum without Miss 
Downey's catching her — Miss 
Jacques' pal — ready with Eddie 
— homework hater — "Number 
pleez" — to business school — 
petite package of pulchritude — 
sometimes quiet, but where? 





ROBERT HURLE 

"A Man To Place Confidence In" 
"Bob" — Spooner St. spooner — 
hard worker at our games — Mr. 
Romano's Messenger Service — 
crazy crew — with that pretty 
junior — tennis anyone? — Stock- 
bridge Ag. School — at Shwoms 
and Cordage Club — "Movaca 
Joe" — future rancher — good 
sport — "Oh, Brother" — Pop's 
V-8 — a real good guy. 



HELEN JOHNSON 

"She Is Never Without Friends 

And Always With Jokes" 
"H.J." — Barb and Beth — Who's 
W. C. ? — nursing school — Jim's— 
pizza from Ernie's- — "O, ya?" — 
men are her desire — star ath- 
lete — Miss Knight's favorite? — 
practical joker — that Rockland 
football game — another Little 
Pond-er — low cut sneakers — 
hates long assemblies — our 
Eartha Kitt — softball hero. 




CHRISTOPHER HUSSEY 

"Never Fast, Never Slow, 
But Always Steady" 
"Chuzz" — Yacht Club fanatic — 
gun lover — bachelor — "Minor de- 
tail" — drawing guns — huge record 
collection — naval architecture- 
likes to relax — hep in trig — 
"I beg your pardon" — with 
Barney and Raunch — those 
bachelor parties — flipping quar- 
ters with other "Cooperites" — 
with the jeep — our Pilgrim 
guide — Mich, or M.I.T. — shoot- 
ing rats. 





LOIS KIERSTEAD 

"She Whom A Dream 
Hath Possessed" 
"Lo" — the hair we'd like most 
to wash — "No, honest?" — 
spaghetti — from roller skat- 
ing to Tassy's — Prince Secre- 
tarial School — this gal longs 
for Bermuda — office assistant — 
canine lover — with Carolyn — 
always highest honors — sweet 
tone of voice — a junior boy 
from Carver — a pleasant, wist- 
ful temperament. 



ANEAL INGENITO 

"He Had No Malice In His Mind, 

No Ruffles On His Shirt" 
"Sam" — P. H. S. mender of bad 
soles — future Burdett-ite — craves 
a trip around the world — (don't 
we all?) — seen most at Tassy's 

— "Mike, shutup" — pizza fiend 

— that Ford — a moustache — 

— summer nights at Whitehorse 
with Ferrari — a pat on the back 

— can give and take jokes — 
cobbler — Problems whiz. 





JANICE KINGMAN 

"Let Us All To Dream" 
"Jan" — she and Jackie — this 
gal's Europe bound ! ! — corres- 
ponding a hobby — won't tell us 
her secret desire! — "Some peo- 
ple !" —Tassy's— N. E. College 
of Pharmacy — a future pill rol- 
ler — friendly — seen ringing up 
sales in Pilgrim Drug — chem- 
istry shark — "Well, well" — a 
scientific mind — pretty baby 
face — Physics fiend. 




VICTOR IZZO 

"A Youth To Fortune 
And To Fame Unknown" 
"Vic" — popular music a must — 
destination unknown — "Look at 
life with a smile" — another 
football star — bowling is his 
meat — those red locks — a bach- 
elor? — North Plymouth is God's 
Country — never out of school 
— recess with the gang — fu- 
ture big wheel — joker deluxe. 



MARILYN KNIGHT 

"She Came to Greener Pastures" 
"Sis" — found at Dartmouth — 
cute kid — she's got problems, 
but they're in democracy — likes 
chicken — oh, those eyes — loves 
eating — "Oh, what will I do?" 
— nursing — good things come 
in small packages — Wareham's 
loss is our gain — easy to win 
friends — cute toot. 





FRANCIS KUHN 

"Life Is A Struggle 

But Not A Warfare" 

"Franny" — passion for taking 

things apart to see how they run 

— future Navy swab — "For cry- 
ing out loud" — speed boat 
racer — li'l Audrey — very quiet 

— a Robinhood — likes to fix 
clocks — seen in his cellar — 
"Don't worry about it" — ■ maca- 
roni and cheese — "So what?" 



JOHN LEDO 

"A Man Of Deeds 
They Found Him" 
"Johnnie" — spaghetti and meat 
balls — Teve's — seen most with 
Chickie — "Oh, come now!" — 
Future Norman Rockwell — pas- 
sion for art and stamps — Pilgrim 
cover — those specs — laconic — 
to own a Caddy and/or Sabre — 
among the egg-layers — also cut- 
ting grass — future pretzel 
bender. 




ROBERT KUHN 

"Of Two Evils, 
Choose The Prettier" 
"Kuhnie" — bowling whiz — with 
Vec, Turtles, and Frankie — fu- 
ture Al Rosen — on the quiet 
side — at First National — "Natch" 

— not much for labor — a painter 

— "I'll deal" — ambition: be a 
commercial artist — neat dres- 
ser — wearing a white apron — 
future national bowling champ. 





CECELIA LILLICH 

"As Busy As A Bee" 
"Cela" — destination: graduation 
— pizza at Tassy's — Pilgrim 
photo editor — Celia and Ann — 
oh, to own a brand new steam- 
lined car! — "Who's square?" — 
shutterbug — down the Old 
Colony — energetic — burning 
flashbulbs with Sal — hurried 
and harried — trim trick — seen 
taking photos for the Pilgrim. 



SALLY LAURENT 

"You Are The Titles. 
And You Catch The Eye" 
"Sal" — wants to do away with 
a certain branch of the service — 
D. B. in the Olds — Gabby and 
the 7:25 kids — "Ma, did I get 
any mail?" — She's engaged!! — 
"Oh, for crying out loud!" — out 
at Tassy's — pastime: getting 
someone in Dutch in study hall 
— seen writing and mailing let- 
ters. 




/ 




SHIRLEY LINTON 

"All Nature Wears 
One Universal Grin" 
"Shirl" — picture her going over 
Niagara Falls in a barrel — 
drives a hot Chev — a trip 
around the world — Sid's — Claire 
and Kay — "Oh, woman" — that 
crazy seat in psych. — "Toddy" 

— a Carver belle — Liberace fan 

— Don — at Manomet — against 
slacks — pizza and chicken — at 
Sunday School. 




HARLEY LECAIN 

"Woman Is The Reason 

For Man's Existance" 

"Chile" — seen most at Hogan's 

— Harley and the horses — pic- 
ture him married — secret de- 
sire to win at the horses! — 
handsome is as handsome does 

— senior girls' desire — with a 
graduate of class of 1953 — our 
hustling left end — McGoff's 
buddy — doesn't like pneumonia. 



ANDREW LOPES 

"My Appetite Comes To Me 
While Eating" 
"Andy" — a clothes shark — with 
Butch and Daddy Coach — our 
baseball captain — that smile of 
his — the back woods of Carver 
— destination: Brooklyn Dodg- 
ers — on the sunny side of the 
street — always lifting a fork — 
jazz digger — always wearing a 
narrow tie or none — clean cut 
look. 




EDMUND LOPES 

"Speed Is Our Safety 

Over Thin Ice" 

" Eddie " — thrives on Caron's 

fudge — ambition: run the 4 

minute mile — our star halfback 

— outside 101 during recess — a 
crooner — always laughing over 
something — future 4 letter man 

— " Lover " — " hey, Biscuit " — 
driving Dino's truck — harrier 
star for 2 autumns — Uncle Sam 
is calling— only backfield man 
never hurt. 



NANCY MALONI 

"Sober, Steadfast, And Demure" 
"Nance" — miniature dogs — Le- 
land's — Claire and Carol — 
Fisher Junior College — we wish 
we had her hair! — "Really, 
tho" — Miss Downey's S. A. S. 
fiend — men are her evil! — so- 
phisticated beauty — that French 
translation — our nomination 
for Miss America 1956 — up at 
Plymouth Beach — fraternity pins 
— a hard class worker — a red- 
head (male). 




RICHARD LOVEJOY 

"A Friend To All 
And A Friend Of All" 
"Dick" — likes hunting — also an 
ace fisherman — on the shy side 
— "Work before pleasure" — seen 
clerking — Oh, to own a car — 
likes handicrafts — with "Nor- 
ton" — good food a must — in- 
formal; hates dressing up — 
somewhat quiet — Lovejoy loves 
joy — our Frank Buck. 





CAROLYN McCOSH 

"Whatever Is Worth Doing At 

All Is Worth Doing Well" 
"Sister" — picture her in busi- 
ness for herself — home, sweet, 
home — Janie — "Not necessar- 
ily" — hairdresser — Jordan H's 
refugee — record collector — Wil- 
fred Academy — "That will be 
the day" — likes dogs — dancer 
— Jane, Gaye, Alice, Carolyn, 
and Janie — ice skating champ. 



DAVID MAFFINI 

"The Boy Hath Grace In Him: 

He Blushes" 
"Muffins" — oh, to make Half- 
way Pond in 5 minutes! — fish- 
ing — "Hey, ma, whatcha got ta 
eat?" — he and Fritz — picture 
him as an accountant — locker 
182 — headed for Bryant College 
— where's that old heap ? — also 
somewhat of an artist — our all 
American tackle — with a senior 
doll. 





ALICE McMANUS 

"I Shall Laugh Myself 
To Death" 
"Irish" — destination: Connecti- 
cut — another Colonial customer 

— seen with everyone ! — our 
hobo queen, remember? — "More 
Spif-la!" — she's lovely, she's en- 
gaged — a yellow convertible — 
twinkle, twinkle, deep blue eyes 

— friendly — peppy and peppy 

— floating on air — with all the 
gals. 




ALAN MAINI 

"I Have Fought A Good Fight; 
Soon I Graduate" 
"Al" — destination? — the "crazy" 
mood — Jim's — to be chief of 
police in Carver — seen most 
eating — "Crazy man, crazy!" — 
lady lover — powerful physique 
— champ bowler — spends his 
dough on recess lunches — pre- 
fers blondes, brunettes, and red- 
heads — a sportcoat and an over- 
coat — in a Ford. 



JAMES McNARY 

"Deeds Before Idle Talk- 
We Must Work" 
"Jim" — a teacher's daughter — 
with Bob — Uncle Sam's a' cal- 
ling — seen down Pete Gellar's 
garage — "No comment" — pump- 
ing petrol — likes fast cars but 
not noisy ones — future stock 
car driver — seen behind a 
wheel — wavy lock — pastime : 
girl friend. 




V 



i 




CLAIRE MEEHAN 

"Nonsense Makes The Heart 
Grow Fonder" 
"Claire" — seen most talking — 
future secretary — own a light 
blue Ford convertible — she 
came from Manomet — very cute 
— seen looking out of the win- 
dow — never, never stops laugh- 
ing — a crazy time with Pat, 
Mary, and Shirl — our first mil- 
lionaire girl — always chewing 
gum. 



JANE MONTANARI 

"But To Be Young 
Was Very Heavenly" 
"Janeo" — cross-country trek — 
Alice and Gaye — Tassy's — to 
own a car with a heater! — "But, 
Gee" — knitting — in Woolworth's 
— blushes — with a smile — Mari- 
lyn and Betty also — kegler — 
in that model T — that cottage 
camp — pizza parties — frantic 
over Florida — waiting for the 
bus. 




ROBERT MELLOR 

"There's Time Enough 
For That" 
"Bob" — Air Force bound — 
Pete's garage in Manomet — he 
and Jim — girls are a necessity! 
— heard saying? no comment — 
secret desire? censored! — a cute 
eighth grader? — that slick Lin- 
coln — lobstering — likes blondes, 
preferably juniors — at the Dairy 
Bar — "Tough" — Manomet bas- 
ketball teams — seen blasting to 
and from Manomet. 







^\^ 




nH ' 






RONALD MONTANARI 

"To Travel The Splendid 
Sphere, And See Its Fame" 
"Klunker" — hangout? anyplace, 
U. S.A. — seen with Jim, Paul, 
and Jerry — "Crazy" — B. U. and 
Stan Kenton's band — those jazz 
records — that D. A. — P. H. S.'s 
Johnny Lattner — chemist — 
sandwiches — his mother's Ital- 
ian cooking — a red hot alto 
sax — Yogi Berra's double — 
" Katman " — protege of Lee 
Konitz. 



FRANCIS MERRITT 

"A True Athlete Is Always 
A Gentleman" 
" Butch " — baseball bug — pic- 
ture him a coach — college comes 
next — "I'm tired" — V. P. of the 
class — ministry — a Rockland 
student nurse — always grinning 

— saved the Whitman and Ab- 
ington games — future Red Sox 
hero — Aurora — "What's that?" 

— bristle bean — found in the 
gym — with Andy — everyone's 
pal — Edaville-ite. 





LUCILLE MOSSEY 

"To Warm The Heart 

Of A Man" 

"Lou" — writes a letter a day — 

Marty, Betts, Margie, and Joyce 

— picture her an orator — "I'm 
only human" — Pilgrim Drug — 
that sixth period study — tiny 
package — cute too — "Oh, Mother" 

— Washington, D. C. here I 
come! — a bride someday soon — 
at Ocean View Ave. — frivolous 
Marty's chum. 




JOSEPH MILLER 

"Remember That Time 
Is Money" 
"Joe" — sleepy boy — "Oh, man! 
to make good money" — Trig, 
fiend — photographer — "Look at 
the picture I dun took" — thick, 
juicy steak — Plympton man — 
let's live a little! — "Try again, 
kid" — oh, those puzzles — North- 
eastern — escaped from Whit- 
man H. S. — sweater wearer — 
mathematical mind — a future 
mechanical engineer — with Deril. 



ROBERT NICOLI 

"Merrily, Merrily, 
Shall I Live Now" 
"Nick" — Deril's car — mushrooms 
a must — oh, to be six feet tall 
— Stonehill College — with Vec, 
outside 304 — "Relax, girls; I'm 
here!" — Pauline "Choo Choo" — 
a future detective — another 
"Crazy" comics fanatic — Jackie 
Gleason's protege — "It's in the 
Book" — thrives on Marilyn Mon- 
roe — a real hot sketch — against 
cravats but not girls. 





JAMES NORTHRUP 

"In Him You Will 
Find A True Friend" 
"Jim" — always at Curriers — big 
boy — craves French — just crazy, 
just crazy — P. H. S.'s big hunter 
— "I didn't do it" — always sleep- 
ing — our band boy — Oh! to go 
to college (B. U.) — laughing in 
trig — Redman — a red hot sax 
"I got a joke" — pinball — that 
beautiful class partner — also a 
phys whiz — baseball star. 



WILLIAM PERKINS 

"He Who Acts As His Own 
Attorney Has A Fool For 
A Client" 
"Wild Bill" — always at the 
Marshfield Rollaway — likes auto 
mechanics — craves pie and girls 
— real P. H. S. wolf — bet his 
bark is worse than his bite — 
picture him a millionaire — 
always talking — Mr. Wilson's 
pet peeve — argumentative- — mid- 
dle of the roader — telling jokes 
to girls — more pie — Navy. 




MARYANNE NUNES 

"Ye Come Late; Yet Ye Come" 
" Nunsie " — writing letters to 
boys — she wants "Holmsie" for 
fifth period study!" — she and 
Faithie — "If I were rich, I 
wouldn't be here!" — hate to do 
it all over again — a brain — 
sings to herself — seen casually 
walking through town — against 
stuffiness or snobbishness. 



nl ' -: 





BEVERLY PIMENTAL 

"A Slight Color 
Tints Her Cheek" 
"Lover" — picture her in a Ford 
convertible — she's glad she's a 
senior — she and Janice — des- 
tination: the sky — longs to 
travel — talking in 6th period 
study — likes roller skating — at 
the cinema — her little sister 
— up at Little Pond — MEN, 
MEN, MEN — having a good 
time — Pilgrim Drug and Co- 
lonial. 



PHILIP OWENS 

"He Is But A Giant 
In Disguise" 
"Philsey" — one of the Carver 
kids — give him a peanut but- 
ter sandwich — "Sacre bleu!" — 
oh! to get out of the back- 
woods of Carver — single, too — 
trig digger — "Sell me a bottle 
of milk?" — Phys whiz — down 
with neckties — the John Brown 
kid — Bob Jones U. in North 
Carolina — trying to get that 
sundae. 





DIANE PINTO 

"Parting Is Such Sweet Sorrow; 

Let Us Linger Yet" 
"Di" — Hogan's University — fav- 
orite subject: Driver Training — 
men and more men — cute kid 

— hard worker — very talkative 

— "Ye Gads" — picture her a 
married secretary — pleasant na- 
ture — speedy — a little fiddle — 
revels over fried clams — a good 
student — that Colgate gleam. 




JOYCE PEDERZINI 

"A Smile To Calm 
Troubled Waters" 
"Joyce" — well - dressed — day 
dreaming — her shiny hair — Pil- 
grim Drug — office assistant — 
fun to be with — Liz, Jet, Syl, 
and Shirl — that wistful look — 
good natured — our S. A. S. Sec- 
retary — future secretary — never 
missed a game — a doll — plenty 
of dates — hot dogs'. — a tennis 
and swimming fan — popular 
with everyone. 



CAROL PIOPPI 

"Her Good Looks Conceal 
Her Sterness Of Purpose" 
"Gabby" — at Tassy's — she had 
problems — yes, problems of de- 
mocracy — likes pizza and men 

— very talkative — "Hi, ya!" — 
pleasant smile — business secre- 
tary — pet peeve: speed demons 

— likes oxygen tents — Laselle 

— those 7:45 conclaves at locker 
228 — fun to be with — Marilyn 
type — Spree chairman — a guy 
at B. U. — energetic. 



t&_ 

& 



>* 




JACQUELINE PIZZOTTI 

"A Little Learning 
Is A Dangerous Thing" 
"Jackie" — always at Jim's — 
favorite subject is English — digs 
pizza — just loves those Carver 
boys — "Oh, Sugar!" — talkative 
— hates work — picture her a 
model — natural teaser — always 
grinning — "I'm all paid up" — 
live a little — says hi to every- 
one — listening to Harpo's jokes. 



JANE REZENDES 

"I Do Not Hastily, 
But Thoroughly" 
"Janie" — always at Sister's — 
favorite subject: English — an- 
other spaghetti kid — cute— Boys! 
— Steno II — oh! — what are your 
margins — elevated — "For Pete's 
sakes" — Becker Jr. College — 
good fashion model — sew sew 
— complacent complexion — right 
on the ball — beats the bell. 




MARJORIE RAYMOND 

"Where's The Man Who 
Could Ease A Heart?" 
"Margie" — always at Tassy's — 
thrives on Driver Training — 
craves pizza — cute little blonde 
— that innocent look — "Hon- 
estly" — talkative — likes Steno 
II — oh, to get married — wants 
to live in Boston — our little 
Margie — Bettemae's chum — 
make a noise over boys — likes 
her 305 seat so as to swap news. 





JERRY ROBBINS 

"Girls Are The Root 

of All Evil" 

"Jerry" — picture him a Civil 

Engineer — also known as 

"Howdy Doody" — pleasant smile 

— likes radios and cars — the 
spaghetti kid — "real cool, man" 

— ambitious — real gone kid — 
10 cent-a-week collector — going 
to Wentworth — freckles — hip- 
ster — likes casual clothes. 



DOROTHY REGGIANI 

"Variety Is The Spice of Life" 
"Dottie" — likes Bookkeeping — 
ambitious — craves pizza — loves 
men — very talkative — "Nasty 
break" — cute kid — very fast — 
picture her in the Air Force — at 
First National — those Chilton- 
ville Mountains — brings the 
order from the store to Cooper's 
and gives Charlie a hard time 
— often with Nance. 





SHIRLEY RONCARTI 

"As Refreshing As A 
Summer Breeze" 
"Shirl" — Jeanette's house — likes 
chicken — "Oh, brother" — thinker 
— always with a smile — P.H.S. 
future teacher — one of our beau- 
tiful cheerleaders — speaks with 
her eyes — smooth dancer — a 
finger in every pie — locker 228 
reveals her beauty — MEN — 
with Liz — guards our S. A. S. 
money — Liz Taylor's double — 
Plymouth Beach — Bridgewater 
Teachers College. 




JUDITH REIS 

"Not Wisely But Too Well" 
"Judy" — Town Wharf — person- 
ality — favorite subject is study 

— cute kid — prefers hot dogs — 
"Oh, boy!" — oh, to box on the 
wharf — crazy gal — one of the 
North Plymouth Pips — get mar- 
ried — pleasant smile — "I hav- 
en't got any money today" — 
survived 12 hard years — turtle 

— naturally curley. 



MARILYN ROSSI 

"Give Me The Right Word 
And I Will Move The World" 
"Mena" — seen at the Five and 
Ten — what a brain — likes 
Steno II — hot dogs and ham- 
burgers — sociable — can you pic- 
ture her an Italian cook? — our 
Secretary — greets you with a 
smile — fast talker — seen doing 
short-hand — secretary to a law- 
yer — down to earth — knows 
hard work — cashier — an arm 
sling — very friendly and like- 
able. 



<& 

* 




ALFEO JOHN RUFFINI 

"He Is Seldom Prominent In 

Conversation And Never 

Wearisome" 

"Chickie" — always with John 

L. — likes radios and airplanes 

— Chickie also craves roast pork 

— can you picture him a pilot? 
■ — plans to attend aviation school 

— little teaser — honor group 
man — still working on first mil- 
lion — likes the technical side of 
things — on the shy side. 



FAITH SHERMAN 

"A Desire To Give 

And Not To Take" 

"Faye" — always in the movies 

— favorite subject: English — 
very talkative — Franny — "It's 
a great life if you don't weaken" 

— got a smile for everybody — 
picture her as a married Marine 

— another pizza fiend — very 
generous — with her cute little 
sisters. 




DENNIS SCAGLIARINI 

"He Is One Who Never 
Inflicts Pain" 
"Scag" — Pal's — home arts — loves 
pizza — "Hey! Hey!" — oh! dem 
girls — to stay awake in psy- 
chology — picture Scag running 
a bread crumb factory — witty 

— swell Joe — that big grin — 
Dennis the Menace — aches for 
a certain soph? — pigskin toter 

— "cut dat out" — a joker at 
recess. 




.-• 




SALLY SHORT 

"Friends Must Bear With 
Each Others Faults" 
"Sal" — found at Bourne Mill — 
our cute little blonde — loves 
living dangerously — craves fried 
chicken — our gal Sal — Boys! — 
"How are we gonna get there?" 

— small but powerful — to be a 
secretary — love that smile — 
in Carver? — roller skating fiend 

— neat. 



WILLIAM SGARZI 

"Imagination That Is Too Active 
Can Easily Prove To Be Serious" 
"Bill" — our Lincoln - Mercury 
King — works at Dad's garage — 
one of Carlo's boys — ships are 
his hobby — loves spaghetti — 
then to Florida ■ — heart's desire 
is to move K. H. S. to Plymouth 
— wants an open air Merc. — 
with Charlie — those tuna sand- 
wiches — cruising around the 
harbor. 




~^ 






f 




ANN SILVA 

"Personality Comes First" 
"Mesta" — always at Tassy's — 
favorite subject is English — Men! 

— loves pizza — silent type — 
"oh! shucks!" — future labora- 
tory technician — plans to attend 
Medical School — can jitterbug 

— seen doing chemistry equa- 
tions — friendly personality — that 
big smile. 






SYLVIA SHEEAN 

"The Art Of Living Is The 
Art Of Loving" 
"Syl" — a living doll — loves her 
study period — loves chicken — 
pleasant smile — "For crying out 
loud" — ambitious — one of our 
beautiful cheerleaders — bound 
for Salem State Teachers Col- 
lege — Recess with a certain jun- 
ior — in Smith's — our soph Sec- 
retary — S. A. S. slave — a string 
of pearls. 



BETTY SILVA 

"Her Face Betokened 
All Things Dear And Good" 
"Betty" — crazy about hot dogs 
— to join the Navy — "I don't 
have any" — shy — roller skat- 
ing — inquisitive — seen with 
Mena — Buzzards Bay — Mrs. 
Whiting's helper — one of the 
girls from the "best part of 
town" — just a living doll — 
bringing in the absentee lists. 





DIANA SILVA 



"As Lively As An 
Itchy Grasshopper" 
always gabbin' with the 
"Get off my ear" — dy- 

— good things come in 
packages — pizza — those 

answers — picture her 
kids — roller skating with 

— likes fudge — square 

— a Nunez fan — tell her 



DANIEL TASSINARI 

"There Is No Short Cut!" 
"Mousie" — Seaver's Academy — 
another one of Carlo's boys — 
real crazy guy — the Michigan 
Polka Kid — likes all sports — 
picture him riding around in a 
convertible Cadillac — witty — 
good loser — teases the girls — 
out at 1:35 sharp — with Will — 
need some razor blades? 




FREDERICK SIMMONS 

"Reach High For Those 
Golden Dreams" 
"Freddie" — always at Frates — 
math fiend — picture him a col- 
lege professor — prefers meatloaf 

— pleasant to be with — Girls! 

— terrific — he is our next mil- 
lionaire — persuasive — made the 
team his senior year — those 
Carver rockets — still trying to 
tap one in — crazy over History 
boards — Whitman gals. 





MARTHA TASSINARI 

"I Find Only The 

Jewels Of Life" 

"Marty" — seen most with Lou 

— pizza — "definitely" — always 
at Tassy's — natural comic — 
Bookkeeping II oh! — '53 Merc — 
eating — sundaes — Burdett — 
"What did you get for an an- 
swer ? " — Oh, to make high 
honors — good natured — frisky 

— firecracker birthday — inquis- 
itive. 



JEANETTE SOUZA 

"Beautiful, Beautiful, 
Brown Eyes" 
"Annette" — always in the mov- 
ies — Boys! Boys! Boys! — "Don't 
get all shook up" — the pizza 
kid — student at Colonial — pleas- 
ant smile — big appetite — talk- 
ative — our candy girl — that 
dreamy gaze — with Bev — curi- 
osity is wonderful — gabbing 
with "Tinny." 





DONALD TAUB 

"To Be Or Not To Be" 
"Dube" — student at Hogan's — 
pretzels and girls, mostly girls 
— another millionaire from P.H.S. 
— full of jokes — one of our 
basketball hoopers — golfer ? — 
where's that necktie ? — throws 
a mean bowling ball — "Cotton 
picking " — that lefty hook — 
blond soph — U. Mass.? — crooner 
Tobias — bop talk — naturally 
lucky — locker room riot — liked 
biology — chewing gum — "Skinny 
popsickle." 




JOSEPH SPINOLA 

"A True Friend Is One Who 

Holds You To Your Best Self!" 
"Daddy Roach" — found at Clara 
Eaton's Store — one of Carlo's 
boys — fried clams for him — 
very talkative — bebop records 

— "Say, Dad" — future Mayor of 
Carver — crazy kid — Air Force 
with A. Lopes — those horn rims 

— good food a must — relaxing 

— a real Kat. 



JUDITH THOM 

"Beauty, So Rich and Rare, 
A Dream To Behold" 
"Red" — clothes — pretty baby — 
craves fried clams — "Come on, 
Ann" — beware: red means dan- 
ger — "Hi, doll" — let's live a 
little — "Did you do your home- 
work?" — another Steno II slave 

— blushes — "Knock, knock, 
who's there?" — spinning dreams 

— waiting for the milkman — a 
double wedding — Jet, Ann, 
Joyce, and Syl. 





JOYCE TUPPER 

"Nothing Ventured, 
Nothing Gained" 
"Joyce" — very talkative — juicy 
steak — cheese and crackers — 
"When Johnny Comes Marching 
Home " — sweet thing — Oh ! — 
Steno II — great kidder — she 
and Marty — always with a ready 
smile — Our 4-H Club honors 
winner — neat as a pin and 
about as tiny — smiling and talk- 
ing — loves animals, especially 
cows. 



CAROLYN VANNAH 

"The Angel Of Our Class, 
The Darling Of Everyone" 
"Carol" — loves gooey sundaes — 
spinning records — Moody's — 
"What I mean" — pretty baby — 
Carolina (the South) — "natch" 

— lovely, simply lovely — Butt- 
ner's salesgirl — with Lois — so 
innocent — a real intelligent chick 

— bell bottom blues — pleasant 
disposition — usually doing some 
heavy studying. 




DONALD VACCHI 

"The Art of Knowledge 
Is Not Enough" 
"Vec" — very studious — always 
at Joe Teves' library with "Biz" 
— can you imagine? He likes 
English — another pizza kid — 
"Hey, Den" — likes models, fe- 
male of course — talkative — get 
him, he's a Braves fan — our last 
touchdown — sleepy — Northeast- 
ern — jovial — 8th grade — trouble 
with science project — baseball 
also. 





AUDREY VERKADE 

"Physical Beauty 
Plus Interior Beauty" 
"Audrey" — the Manomet kid — 
craves spaghetti — get married — 
full of the devil — hockey star — 
"I"ll be back" — blonde but rug- 
ged — sprained ankle at the top 
of her basketball career — cr- 
razy pony tail — athletic intel- 
lectual — at the greenhouses — 
that multifacet sparkle — braids 
— Oh, those English details — a 
math brain. 



JOHN VANCINI 

"Humans Are The 
Cwaziest People" 
"Genghis" — eats up "crazy" 
comics — always eating — "How 
did you get so beautiful?" — 
trouble with the family heap — 
likes young babes (grade 8 & 9 
say?) — optimist — '56 Olympics 
— dance commercials — Treas- 
urer — "Let's blast" — psychia- 
trist — ambitious — sundaes — mak- 
ing Ira laugh — Hobo Hop chair- 
man — golfer ? — " You cotton - 
picking granny - dodger " — har- 
rier — jerk (soda) — 5 different 
colleges — "Hi, Doll." 





RODMAN WALLEY 

"All Men Look Up To Him" 
"Rod - Babe" — real cool — pool 
shark — picture Babe as a state 
cop — "I don't know"— Air Force 
General-to-be — a natural humper 
— our big boy — big jokes — 
easy come, easy go — is he on 
stilts? — made the team his last 
j ear — has problems (of democ- 
racy) — pencil on his ear — with 
Ronnie. 




ROBERT VANDINI 

"A Real Lady Killer 
At His Best" 
" Van " — always playing — stu- 
dent at Hogan's University — 
"You can't sew so good" — real 
gone — oh ! to be like Sid — 
fights for Portuguese Navy — 
"You're cute" — our pigskin end 
— a real heart breaker — with 
Scag, Staples, and the boys — 
liked bucketball intramurals — 
those Colonial ties — Pepsi Cola 
truck — soph girls. 



RICHARD WATERMAN 

"I Caught The Biggest Fish" 
"Doc" — "Ma's" pal — "You said 
it" — got class spirit — sleepy — 
' ' Good man ! ' ' — Cooper jerk 
(soda) — mocha frappe and 
French fries — lady killer — that 
blue Olds — independent — "You 
fathead, Vancini" — journalist at 
A. I. C. — bowled a 143 ! ! — Sat- 
chmo fan — likes New York — 
"Yes, Mr. Nunez " — DeMolay 
basketball star — snores — a pole 
vaulter — a nickname for every- 
one. 




r 



ROGER WEAVER 

"Life, Without Art, Is Nothing" 
"Rog" — likes art — "That can't 
be printed" — oh! — a flat tire — 
square dance fiend — to live in a 
garret room at Greenwich Vil- 
lage — attends Leland's Institute 

— oh, those crazy answers — 
some kidder — inquisitive type 

— going to RISD — he Charles- 
stons — a DeMolay wheel — 
"You're fighting me" — at Coop- 
er's with Sam and Jay — "Ter- 
rific" — Yacht Club fanatic. 



ELIZABETH WOOD 

"Thus Do We Reach The Stars" 
"Betty" — sweet seniorita — 
lovely — dig those crazy answers 

— always with Shirl — inquisi- 
tive — talkative — stubborn — 
blushes — likes to be teased — 
pretty smile — in Smith's — fu- 
ture teacher (lucky pupils — 
tries to get mad but can't — 
worked hard to plan graduation 

— would like to make Mich. 
State — peddle pushers — fight- 
ing her brothers — - basketball 
star — nice report card. 




^>>^ 



JACQUELINE WESTON 

"A Rose Among The Thorns" 
" Jacky" — loves dancing — "I'm 
irked" — pizza — Boys! — talka- 
tive — real friendly — it's bigger 
than both of us (her car) — 
Mich. State, here I come! — looks 
up to everyone (has to) — seri- 
ous student — seen at the library 
— tap dancing and gymnastics — 
artistic — ballerina — future in- 
terior decorator — curly locks — 
with Sue — the tip toe kid. 





JUNE WOOD 

"Baby Doll, You 
Beautiful Baby Doll" 
"Russ" — always spinnin' records 
— piano player — music, music, 
music — to be a secretary — 
"Beautiful" — pleasant personal- 
ity — loved by all — persuasive 
little girl! — very friendly — those 
fathomless brown eyes, man! — 
best dish in Currier's — that old 
Summer St. gang — our Frosh 
Veep — smooth dancer — goes for 
older guys — says hi with a 
smile. 



RALPH WILLIS 

"His Silence Answers Yes" 
"Choo Choo" — this kid eats — 
crazy about a redhead — to be- 
come a four-letter man — be- 
ware of the quiet type — good 
looking — "But" — never heard 
of it before — football star — 
our milkman — those long punts 
— sparking the junior varsity — 
"Buddies, Walt" — involved in a 
double wedding — all-around ath- 
lete. 



f* 
K 




WAYNE WOOD 

"To Be, Rather Than To Seem" 
"Woody" — always fixing cars — 
juicy steak — selling Studebak- 
ers — jolly guy — a natural comic 

— really gone — "Oh! to stay at 
home" — please! — has a lot of 
weight around school — "Come 
on, Mike" — pastime: snoozing 

— also a pool shark — our All- 
American guard for 2 years — 
good at basketball. 




MICHAEL WILSON 

"Take Life As It Comes, 
It Is All For The Best" 
"Mike" — always watching T. V. 
— official chicken cleaner — 
"Make mine steak" — easy come, 
easy go — talkative — "Ain't got 
none " — sleepy — " Cut it out, 
Mousie " — engineer — six study 
periods — at George's — digging 
graves with Uncle Russ — Prob- 
lems whiz — wants seven Sat- 
urdays a week 



ANN ZANELLO 

"The Girl Of Our Dreams" 
"Little Ann" — men — talkative 
— "Wait a minute, Red" — beauty 
itself — sharp dresser — to be a 
brain — pizza — just loves school? 

— loves Steno II — real kidder — 
quite inquisitive — a daydreamer 

— can't keep from grinning — 
when she and the gals get to- 
gether, wow ! — Honeybun — a 
singer and dancer — how about 
Fairhaven? 











MY CREED 



tVo ?7(?r choose to be a common num. It is 
my right to he uncommon- if Icon. I 
seek opportunity - not security . I do 
not wish to be a kept citizen, humbled 
and dulled by having the state look 
after me. 1 want to take the calculated risk; to 
dream and to build, to fail and to succeed. I refuse 
to barter incentive for a dole. I prefer the challenges 
of life ro the guaranreed existence; the thrill of 
fulfil Im cnr to the stale calm of Utopia. 

jjyt/Jt will not trade freedom for beneficence iwr . 
uJI/rWI m y dignity lor a handout. I will never cower ' | 
1 2/ before any master nor bend to any threat. 



p| It is tnu heritage to stand erect, proud and un 
afraid; to think and act for myself, enjoy the 
benefit of my creations and to face the world 
|p,j. boldly and say, this I have done. 

J\ll this is what it means to be an American. 














c <*""* **' 



, eNCflOJSf 7 * chicac 



Reprinted from an attractive full-color scroll published by 
Beaux Arts Engrossers, 30 No. LaSalle St., Chicago 2, 111. 




Best Dressed 

Judith Thorn 
Paul Ferazzi 




Qmot 





Most fun to be with 

Carol Pioppi 
Dennis Barret 



Best looking 

Louis Cappela 
Mary Eldridge 



f\ 







Best all 'round 

Shirley Roncarati 
Donald Fantoni 



Most talented 

Louis Cecco 
Jackie Weston 






Best natured 

Joyce Pederzini 
Francis Merrit 





Most likely to succeed 

Marie Hasz 
Ira Carlin 



Best dancers 

June Wood 
Wallace Crowell 




Most talkative 

Elizabeth Wood 
Robert Vandini 



c 









J. 



\ 



Most flirtatious 

Edward Borgatti 
Elizabeth Bobb 




/lit^d 0$ 74e Pkuf 




BEST GIRL CITIZEN 



This is the seventeenth year that the National 
Society of Daughters of the American Revolution 
has asked high school seniors throughout the United 
States to choose their Best Girl Citizens. We, the 
class of 1954, have selected, on the basis of ability, 
character, and service, Marilyn Rossi. 

Marilyn has been outstanding during her three 
years of high school. Consistently superior in schol- 
arship, she is a member of the Honor Group and 
Honor Society. For two years she has served 
efficiently as our class secretary. She is also one of 
the leading office assistants. 

We are proud to present Marilyn Rossi as Best 
Girl Citizen. 



ONCE AGAIN, THE STARS 




Vice-president, Francis Merrit; President, Ira Carlin; Advisor, Mrs. Raymond; Secretary, 
Marilyn Rossi; Treasurer, John Vancini. 



AMERICAN DRAMA 

"I hear America singing, the varied carols do I hear." These memorable 
words of Walt Whitman's have set the question spiraling through my mind: 
What do I hear, and what are the carols of America? 

First, I hear the carol of the honking Canada goose, wild and free, 
winging northward with his mate. I hear the sounds of the chase — the 
pounding of the horses' hooves, the panting of the hound dogs, and then 
the triumphant shouts of the hunters as they halt before a fallen prey. I 
hear the shouts of American boys and girls bicycling through the country, 
stopping now and then under the shade of the Horse Chestnut for a mom- 
ent's rest, and to drink from the cool spring. The muted song of the hermit 
thrush, the cry of the whippoorwill, the hoot of an owl, the wind rustling 
in the trees are all music to my ears. 

Then, I hear the tramp of American troops fighting on some far distant 
hillside for the freedom they believe in, and dying desolately for the 
heritage that is theirs. I hear the whipping of our flag and see that the 
"star spangled banner yet waves" in the cold "dawn's early light." I hear 
the clear notes of the bugle at revielle, and at the closing in of day the 
distant sound of taps trembles on the air. 

I hear the laughing cries of the happy child at play as she flits from 
one game to another. I hear the shouts of young boys busy at baseball in 
the neighborhood sandlot, the future servants and leaders of America. 
I hear the hopeful humming of the teenager as he tinkers for hours with 
a "souped up" jalopy, hoping to make the radio blare still louder; and the 
anguished cry of the high school girl, "But Mom, I'll simply die wearing 
rubbers to school at my age!" I hear the cheery "morning" of the janitor, 
and the tapping of the secretary's typewriter keys as she transcribes dic- 
tation. I hear the scurrying about of the part time salesgirl as she searches 
deftly to satisfy some fussy customer's demand, and I watch her eagerly 
eyeing the clock at 5:25 p.m., wondering how she will ever finish all the 
homework and still manage to go to the movies. I hear the stock boys 
whistling their tunes as they go blithely on their way, good naturedly 
jostling one another. 

I hear the song of the farmer plowing and planting his field; the greet- 
ing of the neighborhood mailman; the lusty "Eh, Cumpari!" of the fisher- 
man, just returned with his daily catch of cod, haddock, and mackerel; 
and I hear the impatient screech of truck brakes as the driver hastens to 
finish his run for the day. I hear the hum of the presses and the blatant 
cries of the newsboy, "Paper, get your evening paper!" as he advertises 
the daily news on each street corner; and I hear the chatter of the pneu- 
matic drill at work with the construction gang. 

And all over America I hear the clarion call of the school bells, thous- 
ands of young feet hurrying or lagging, thousands of raucous youthful 
voices; then the din of the cafeteria and the screaming silence of the class- 
room clocks. 

The chanting of the priest in the church as he intones the ritual of the 
mass, and the lofty hymns of the choir threading their way up to God, 
along with the mighty strains of the organ I hear. I hear the song of the 
rabbi in the synagogue, the fervent entreaties of the Evangelist on the 
street corner, and the benediction of the minister from his pulpit. 

Such is America, my heritage. I hear America laughing and sobbing. I 
feel her pulse beat as she sleeps and I hear the throb of her great all- 
embracing heart, as she wakes ! 

Carol Brooks Foley 



From UnderstudykStar 

Class Of 1954 



n CHOSEN </r S 




'^s po£ ^ 



J cg5^° 



THE CLASS OF 1954 
presents 

For A Lifetime 

Music by Jerry Cecco, Louis Correia, Ronald Montanari 

Book and Lyrics — Bob Nicoli and Phil Owens 

Directed by Dick Waterman 

Musical Director — Jimmy Dykeman 

Choreography — Jackie Weston and Sandra Eastman 

Assistant Directors Scene Designer Lighting Designer 

Norman Boudreau Roger Weaver ass'td. by Bill Perkins 

Ronald Caton Joyce and Jeanette Brenner 

Ticket Agencies 
New York — Beverly Busi London — Marilyn Knight 

Instanbul — Johnny Vancini Martinique — Judy Reis 

Paris — Beverly Pimental Singapore — David Barnes 

Members of the Ensemble 

Ladies — Kay Alexander, Celia Howe, Beverly Black, 

Ann Harlow, Sylvia Holmes, Mildred Herries 

Men — Jimmy Burt, Dan Tassinari, Don Vacchi, Michael Wilson, 

John Ledo, John Ruffini 

Corps de Ballet 

Shirley Linton, Betty Bobb, Gaye Fraccalossi, Roland Gibbs, 
Ronald Fantoni, Robert Gunther, Deril Fernald 

Alumni Theater Productions Orchestra 

Carol Pioppi, Jimmy Northrup, Neal Ingenito, 
Billy Sgarzi, Paul Baratta, Jerry Robbins 

Acknowledgments 

Costumes by Christine Brigida Flowers by Gloyd's 

and Jeanette Burt Maini's Auction Galleries 

Barrett and Scagliarini, Caterers Pat Gibbs' Hair Styles 

The Mary Eldridge Riding Academy Willis' Concessions 

Andrew Lopes Properties Co., Inc. Ferazzi's Haberdashery 

Freyermuth and Dunlap Cab Company 
Furs by Carolyn McCosh 

For A Lifetime presented through the arrangement of the 
Costa-Bumpus Music Library, N. Y. 

The theater building certified by Guidoboni-Grennell 
Underwriters Laboratory 



Alumni Theater Productions, Inc. 

Organization 

George Anderson President 

Donald Gellar Vice-President 

Marilyn Rossi Secretary 

Sally Short Treasurer 

Executive 

Eddie Borgatti Managing Director and Counsel 

John Ghidoni Special Consultant 

Lois Kierstead General Manager 

Production 
Secretary — Joyce Pederzini Publicity Director — Eddie Lopes 

Program Director — Jimmy McNary Assistant Manager — Nancy Maloni 

Assistant to the Treasurer — Richard Lovejoy 

Box Office Treasurers — Sally Laurant, Robert Kuhn, Edith Wall 

Make-up Artists — Jeanette Souza and Betty Silva 

Usherettes — Jane Montanari, Jane Gunther, Alice McManus 

Technical 

Production Stage Manager — John Hanson 

Resident scene designer — Victor Izzo Production Assistant — Alice David 

Wardrobe mistresses — Ann Zanello Props — David Maffini 
and Judy Thorn 



Ira Carlin 

Jackie Pizzotti 

Lucille Mossey 
Marjorie Raymond 
Bettemae Brewer 

Sally Arons 

Harley LeCain 

Janice Kingman 
Charles Branagan 

Cecelia Lillich 

Frances Merritt 



Cast 

elderly, wealthy businessman pursued by 
his private secretary and 

chorus girls on Broadway 

his true love, a child psychologist 

local playboy with an interest in oil wells 

authorities on medicinal herbs of Kabul 

international newspaper woman 

Dean of Canterbury on tour of the United States 



Gail Borgatti and Betty Barboza — governesses for Cecelia's children 

engineers reconstructing the Guillotine 



Chris Hussey 
Joe Miller 
Louis Cappella 

Donna Barufaldi and Audrey Verkade — 

physical education instructors at Yale 



Lorraine Freitas 
Diana Silva 
Jean Drew 

George Arnold 

Helen Johnson 

Martha Tassanari 



nurses attending the demanding Ira 

archaeologist from the Himalayas 

only female member of the Harlem Globe Trotters 

successful veterinarian 



Revue 

Last night's presentation by the Aumni Theater Productions Corpora- 
tion was the scene of much reminiscing as the lobby of the R. Vitti Theater 
filled with familiar faces. 

The spot light glared on the center aisle as a large group arrived from East 
Chicopee Falls University, including Carol Connelly, dean of admissions; 
Dolores Almeida, Sylvia Sheehan, and Pat Gellar of the business depart- 
ment; James Goodwin, history professor; Shirley Roncarati and Betty 
Wood, invertebrate zoology instructors; Mary Fontes and Ann Silva, 
graduate students in social pathology; and Marie Hasz, director of the School 
of Nursing. The Turkish rage for male secretaries seems to have found its 
way to Washington, as Karin Engstrom, Secretary of the Interior, arrived 
with secretary, Robert Hurle. Donald Taub, Ambassador to Siam, and Joseph 
Spinola, director of native education in Bechuanaland, South Africa, were 
seated in a box not far from that occupied by Massachusetts' Senator W. 
Crowell, his chauffeur, Claire Meehan, and a very strange woman, who, it is 
rumored, was Nancy Bartlett. 

Among the most severe critics of the performance were Rodman Wally 
and Faith Sherman, disc jockeys on the B. B. C. At about the middle of the 
first scene, there was a slight commotion in the right aisle as Joyce Given, 
Mary Nunes, and Joyce Tupper, directors of a currently popular home 
economics program on T. V., entered. During the decrescendoes in the 
music, could be heard Bob Mellor, Frank Formica, and Donald Fantoni, 
arguing about the merits of their respective car companies. 

Bob Fraccalossi, AU-American, Joanne Goodwin, international golf 
champ, and Francis Kuhn, winner of the Albany-New York Outboard Race, 
currently appearing at the Sportsman's Show under the management of 
Ronnie Ferioli, were forced to fight their way through the crowd of youth- 
ful fans in order to reach the theater. 

We heard a member of the T. W. A. fleet, operated by Claire Connelly, 
fly overhead and soon we were honored with the presence of Dorothy Reg- 
giani and Diane Pinto, secretaries from the Pentagon, Bob Vandini, beach- 
comber on the Riviera, and Fred Simmons, head of a firm considering the 
possibilities of moving the Casbah to Chile. Fred had with him two of his 
valuable assistants, Carolyn Vannah and Jane Rezendes. Just before the 
doors closed, Wayne Wood, recently returned from the Mexican Road Race, 
pulled up in a cloud of smoke with June Wood and Kay Hacking, interpre- 
ters at the U. N. 

We understand that the Class of 1954 has fascinating plans for next year, 
and wish them the same success they have enjoyed in the past. 





WMSZ OF 

TqMOJUlOW 

►Bec/mse <yf iasics we££ efone 




\>f joys <incf sorrows sftarecf , 
^Now^exujeHy wsAyty, cls is -our nature, 
We open tne dbortctfie fiouse of tomorrow*. 
Tfie size of tne rooms will vury 
^s must ihz tilings tfiat tftey contain, . 
"We may meet sorrmvin some narrow room, 
CrampeoPxinof eonfinecP, rraty <icme io Jfocw 
^e£f- diseipfiae. In yet another room 

QiscouinigBmmt, djefeai, despair 
^lay wait. 'Tk flei^e w^e must Be siring. 

Fsn*^ ffiaiiur-Q is <i wrncCcrw, ^xiref we 
Jviust wT-encii it ^pen wicfe tcr see 
^Tftat from our errors we e/ux ^e*irn. 
we ^fcPt our Read's . 'XVe see xtnotnet* imjoui . 
^tvcC (We we tarr^y, for tnis is tile p&ice 
Of evtinivu^ani afi^exxirvs aucf curious f^xu^s . 
■we must qain <l sense of p rsypor^tioii 
kk JSefore we enter a spacious i<com to R/iow^ 
*Tfie joycf a siatt acquired*, of a task 

>ve£E ^Cbne , 
Of service watfi ao inougilt ^>f seif . 
J\cw, niunBCy awcLretiiat we possess 
Tnepower^cfioice, we open otfter doors, 
JrmRtJ\e£^r3omojaiiuiioj strengt/l 
To open tne door to tile next • 




STAGE BULLETINS 



SEPTEMBER 

Mr. Mongan welcomed all of us and started us off toward another step in our lives. 
We recognized Citizenship Week at an assembly at which Mr. Mongan spoke on "The 
Price of Our Education." 

Demonstrations of our vocal ability were given at our first pep meeting and football 
game, which was a victory. 

The S. A. S. started this year was a "bang"! It sponsored the annual Get Together 
Dance which gave the sophomores an opportunity to view the social life at P. H. S. 

OCTOBER 

We 1 students were greatly honored to have Senator John F. Kennedy as our speaker 
at the Columbus Day assembly in MemorialHall. 

The S. A. S. presented champion archer, Robert Terry — Mr. Terry was indeed a 
champion archer as well as a wonderful comedian. 

Another important event this month was the enter- 
taining of the Southeastern Branch of the S.A.S. in Mas- 
sachusetts. Our members did a fine job and much credit 
is due to them. President Paul Ferazzi delivered his 
well-prepared welcome speech, while the other speak- 
ers, Mr. Welch, Mr. Mongan, and Miss Katherine Bron- 
son, a member of the national advisory committee, looked 
on. Mr. Oswald Blumit was introduced by Ira Carlin, 
chairman of the Program Committee. Mr. Blumit spoke 
on "Communism — Our Public Enemy Number 1." 
Everyone enjoyed the delicious supper and fine music 
of Jerry Cecco and his orchestra, which concluded the 
S. A. S. Convention. 

NOVEMBER 

The Debating Club made its entrance into the lime- 
light by presenting a debate on Universal Military 
Training. 

The S. A. S. presented Danny Johnson, a young 
magician, who was enjoyed by the teachers as well as 
students. 

The Seniors were at last ready to make 
their debut at the Hobo Hop, their last dance 
before graduation. 

DECEMBER 

Donald Scott Morrison, a conversationalist- 
pianist was the artist brought to us this 
month by the S.A.S. Mr. Morrison portrayed 
some well-known composers and entertained 
us with other humorous bits. 

Mrs. Alice Urann and the Dramatic Club 
truly portrayed the Christmas spirit in their 
excellent production. Mrs. Urann is to be 
congratulated for producing her tremendous 
plays during our high school days. 





FEBRUARY 

Dr. Martin, head of the Plymouth County Hos- 
pital, spoke to us about the causes and effects of 
tuberculosis. 

Mrs. Helen Bagnell, who was in charge of our 
Patriotic Assembly, introduced to us Mr. Thomas 
A. Buckley, who spoke about Citizenship. The Girls' 
Ensemble sang also. 

MARCH 

The Dramatic Club gave a public performance 
held over for two continuous nights. C'est La Vie 
was a variety show and two short three-act plays. 

The S. A. S. presented the film A is 
for Atom, an interesting and educa- 
tional feature. They also presented 
John Nichols, whose topic was Ameri- 
cans at Work. 

The Science Department exhibited 
many interesting and unusual projects 
at the annual Science Fair. 

APRIL 

The S. A. S. presented Ruth McFarlin, 
radio and concert tenor, who was en- 
joyed by all of us, especially the 
music lovers. 





MAY — JUNE 

At last another year has 
ended ! A year filled with ex- 
citement and prosperity. 

The S. A. S. has done a won- 
derful job this year in organizing 
and planning the dances and 
assemblies. Above all, they made 
other lives brighter by present- 
ing the television sets to County 
Hospital. 

And now the class of 1954 
bids Plymouth High School fare- 
well as they receive their re- 
wards for a long, hard but 
pleasant journey. 















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1. MISS WILBUR . . . ."The best things in life are free." 



2. MR. ROGERS .... "It isn't whether you win or lose, but how you play the game.' 



S. 



3. MR. ROMANO .... "Do your share and more too!' 



4. MR. SMILEY 



"Whatever life work you may choose, make your chief object 
helping others." 



5. MRS. URANN .... "C'est la vie." 



6. MRS. RAYMOND . . "Plan your work and work your plan." 



7. MR. WILSON .... "It's OK to "kid" others, but not yourself.' 



8. MR. YOUNG .... "Opportunity often comes by accident — preparedness never.' 



i. 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



The Student Council of Plymouth High 

The Student Council of Plymouth High School has enjoyed a success- 
ful year under the direction of President Paul Ferazzi and Faculty Advisor, 
Miss Ellen Downey. 

Besides five excellent assembly programs, we have had two dances, the 
annual "Get-Together Dance" in September and the "Holly Hop" at 
Christmas time. 

In October Plymouth's Student Council entertained about four hundred 
fellow student council members from some thirty high schools in South- 
eastern Massachusetts. The Fall Convention of the Associated Student 
Councils of Southeastern Massachusetts could not have been the success 
it was without the untiring efforts of every council member. 

The year ending in June 1954 will find the Student Council completing 
another humanitarian project based on the slogan "T. V. for T. B. — 1954." 
With the money contributed by all students one, and maybe two television 
sets will be purchased for the patients at the South Hanson County Hos- 
pital. We sincerely hope Alfred Vierra, Fred Sherman, Dennis Longtin, 
and Roy Vitti will get well faster with this gift from their Alma Mater. 

The Student Council members are always ready and willing to help 
in any activity of Plymouth High School. We are sincerely grateful for 
the cooperation of all students and give a particular "Thank you" to the 
Class of 1954. 






STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

Back Row: Donald Fantoni, Ira Carlin, John Vancini, Edward Borgatti, Robert Miskelly, 

Walter McCann, Douglas Beane, Everett Doten. 
Middle Row: Claire Vancini, Joan Whiting, Marilyn Zaval, Mary Po, Patricia Stefani, 

Ernestine Zinani, Nancy Maffini, Lois Kierstead, Helen Johnson, Rita Giaccaglia, Marie 

Serra. 
Front Row: Janice Cavicchi, Sylvia Sheehan, Jeanette Brenner, Shirley Roncarati, Miss 

Downey, Paul Ferazzi, Howard Benassi, Joyce Pederzini, Nancy Maloni, Karin 

Engstrom. 




T.B. FUND COLLECTORS 

Back Row: Ernestine Zinani, Patricia Stefani, Sylvia Sheehan, Mary Po, Joyce Pederzini, 

Claire Vancini, Helen Johnson. 
Middle Row: Paul Ferazzi, Donald Fantoni, Howard Benassi, Robert Miskelly, Edward 

Borgatti, John Vancini, Everett Doten. 
Front Row: John Whiting, Rita Giaccaglia, Janice Cavicchi, Jeanette Brenner, Nancy 

Maffini, Miss Downey, Lois Kierstead. 




PILGRIM STAFF 

Fourth Row: Carlton Resnick, Elliot Segal, Philip Canevazzi, James Goodwin, Philip 

Sherman, Peter Miller, Christopher Hussey, Bernard Barufaldi. 
Third Row: Sally Arons, Claire Connelly, Delores Almeida, Robert Kuhn, John Ledo, 

Wallace Crowell, Charles Branagan, Patricia Brady, Carol Foley, Marcia Hasz, 

Robert Miskelly. 
Second Row: June Wood, Jacqueline Weston, Joyce Pederzini, Mary Bradley, Jeanette 

Brenner, Carol Melahoures, Marie Hasz, Barbara Warnsman, Elizabeth Bobb, Carol 

Harney. 
Front Row: Janice Kingman, Audrey Verkade, Carol Connelly, Cecilia Lillich, Nancy 

Maloni, Karin Engstrom, Mr. Roland Holmes, Joyce Brenner, Edward Borgatti, Ira 

Carlin, John Vancini. 



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OFFICE ASSISTANTS 

Back Row: Marilyn Rossi, Betty Silva, Eleanor Bates, Elizabeth Lemieux, Jeanette 
Brenner, Joyce Pederzini. 

Front Row: June Wood, Christine Brigida, Mrs. Marion Whiting, Lois Kierstead, Betty 
Mae Brewer. 



! *umtfi itmniiMMwn im m 1 1 i i miiKiaum 




FROM THE SCRIPT ROOM 

Back Row: Martha Tassinari, Claire Victoria, Alice David, Judith Thorn, Ann Alberghini, 
Fannie Hadaway, Cecelia Lillich, Dorothy Pacheco, Carol Vierra, Mr. Arthur Pyle, 
Carol Petocchi. 

Front Row: Carol Foley, Ernestine Zinani, Shirley Linton, Mary Eldridge, Jacqueline 
Pizzotti, Ann Zanello, Elizabeth Bobb, Alice McManus. 



PRESS CLUB 

The Plymouth High Press Club, with faculty advisor Miss Margie 
Wilbur, has the job of writing up school events and sending a weekly 
account of the news to the Brockton Enterprise and the Old Colony 
Memorial. Besides covering school assemblies, sports, and club news, this 
year the Press Club has written about class activities, college applicants, 
yearbook work, and other less obvious but nevertheless interesting topics. 
The reporters, each with a nose for news, could often be seen interviewing 
teachers and students for choice bits of information. We hope P. H. S. 
and its fans have enjoyed reading the school news in the local and Brock- 
ton newspapers. Next year's Press Club reporters will have to hustle to 
do as energetic and as thorough a job as this year's staff has done. 




PRESS CLUB 

Back Row: Rita Matinzi, Ralph Matinzi, Carlton Resnick, Bernard Barufaldi, Mary 

Bradley, Carol Foley. 
Front Row: Miss Margie Wilbur, Ira Carlin, Carol Connelly, John Vancini, Elizabeth 

Wood, Jacqueline Weston. 




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STARS IN THE MAKING 

Sixth Row: Thomas Pickles, Paul Ferazzi, Donald Fantoni, Lawrence Paul, George 
Anderson, Victor Izzo, Robert Fraccalossi, Robert Vandini, James Ruffini, David 
Watson, Gerald Furtado, James Goodwin. 

Fifth Row: Theresa Furtado, Loretta Borgatti, Robert Rose, Elliot Segal, Mary Po, 
Joan Whiting, Rita Dietlin, Claire Vancini, Rita Martinzi, Judith Remick, Ellen 
MacKinnon, Jay Horton, Bernard Barufaldi, Charles Barrett, Philip Canevazzi. 

Fourth Row: Ronald Kritzmacher, Audrey Wood, Patricia Brady, Beverly Black, 
Priscilla Smith, Howard Benassi, Paul Borsari, Ira Carlin, Mary Bradley, Danine 
Potter, John Vancini, Christopher Hussey, Janice Cavicchi, Ann Marie Zucchelli, 
Claire Mitchell, Helen Johnson, Gerald Goodwin. 

Third Row: Marilyn Arons, Carol Foley, Patricia Stefani, Eleanor Bates, Judith Green, 
Robert Matinzi, Diana Silva, Claire Gavoni, Janice Cadorette, Ann Alberghini, Carol 
Marois, Walter McCann. 

Second Row: Carol Petocchi, Sally Arons, Elizabeth Bobb, Sandra Eastman, Audrey 
Scagliarini, Dora Lee Roulston, Phyllis Estes, Jacqueline Weston, Audrey Verkade, 
Barbara Warnsman, Marilyn Zaval, Claire Victoria, Nancy Maffini, Mrs. Alice Urann. 

Front Row: Robert Barufaldi, James Swanton, Douglas Beane, Carlton Resnick, Richard 
Waterman, Gary Smith, Alfred Tadgel, Peter Miller, Philip Sherman. 





BANK TELLERS 

Third Row: Mary Lou Enos, Elissa Benassi, Rose Cannucci, Dorothy Parker, Elizabeth 

Tubman, Francis Tibbetts, Betty Schneider, Howard Benassi. 
Second Row: Norman Wood, Ann Pickles, Natalie Silva, Judith Nunez, Dora Lee Roul- 

ston, Phyllis Estes, Ann Marie Zucchelli, Loretta Borgatti, Robert Matinzi, Suzanne 

Longtin, Nancy Gulhang. 
Front Row: Miss Elizabeth Kelly, James Goodwin, Robert Hurley, Nancy Maloni, Carol 

Connelly, Ann Zanello, Nancy Bartlett, Jacqueline Pizzotti, Ann Guidoboni. 



FROM THE BOX OFFICE 




TEN-CENT-A-WEEK COLLECTORS 

Fourth Row: Richard Fernandes, Daniel Tong, Stephen Thomas, Jay Horton, David 

Maffini, Gerald Pimental, Neal Ingenito. 
Third Row: Brenda Pioppi, Jerome Santos, Richard Doyon, Howard Benassi, Ronald 

Kritzmacher, Robert Barufaldi, Ellen MacKinnon, Robert Rose. 
Second Row: Mary Waitt, Carol Marois, Janice Cavicchi, Phyllis Estes, Beverly Fohrder, 

Marie Serra, Dorothy Pacheco, Claire Victoria, Ann Alberghini. 
Front Row: Beatrice Costa, Shirley Roncarati, Lois Kierstead, Christine Brigida, Edward 

Borgatti, Joyce Pederzini, Ronald Ferioli, Mr. Mario Romano. 




HONOR GROUP 

Third Row: Wallace Crowell, Ira Carlin, Philip Owens, Edward Borgatti, John Vancini, 

John Ruffini. 
Second Row: Shirley Roncarati, Christine Brigida, Elizabeth Wood, Carol Connelly, 

Carolyn Vannah, Joanne Goodwin. 
Front Row: Marilyn Rossi, Jacqueline Weston, Sylvia Sheehan, Claire Connelly, Lois 

Kierstead, Mrs. Miriam Raymond. 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Third Row: Elizabeth Lemieux, Lois Kierstead, Carol Connelly, Marilyn Rossi, John 

Vancini, Howard Benassi, Douglas Beane. 
Second Row: Joyce Brenner, Dora Lee Roulston, Barbara Warnsman, Patricia Brady, 

Walter McCann, Philip Sherman. 
Front Row: Shirley Roncarati, Marie Hasz, Edward Borgatti, Christine Brigida, Wallace 

Crowell, Ira Carlin, Sylvia Sheehan. 




ORCHESTRA 

Back Row: Ronald LaRocque, Paul Baratta, James Dykeman, Philip Sherman, Louis 
Cecco, Ronald Kritzmacher, David Besegai, Daniel Tong, James Northrup. 

Front Row: Robert Gavoni, Ronald Montanari, Everett Doten, Alfred Tadgell, Mr. John 
Pacheco, Nicholas Carreira, Daniel Caton, Paul Borsari. 




BAND AND DRUM MAJORS 

Fourth Row: Glen Simmons, William Sgarzi, David Besegai, Philip Sherman, Daniel 

Caton, Ronald Montanari. 
Third Row: Louis Cecco, Peter Shaw, Stephen Gilbert, Stephen Winokur, Ronald 

LaRocque, Everett Doten, Leonard Reggiani, Nicholas Correira. 
Second Row: Ronald Kritzmacher, John Bates, Vincent Tassinari, James Dykeman, 

Paul Baratta, Robert Gavoni, Dennis Silva, Paul Borsari. 
Front Row: Claire Vancini, Wallace Crowell, Daniel Tong, Mr. John Pacheco, Julia 

Barros, Alfred Tadgell, James Northrup, Joan Whiting. 




ENSEMBLE 

Back Row: Marilyn Zaval, Mary Po, Judith Greene, Diana Silva. 

Middle Row: Delores Almeida, Marcia Hasz, Marie Hasz, Carol Connelly, Christine 

Brigida, Jeanne Caron. 
Front Row: Judith Thom, Patricia Brady, Carol Foley, Mary Bradley, Rita Dietlin, 

Jacqueline Weston. 




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

Third Row: Jacqueline Weston, Rita Dietlin, Jeanne Caron, Lulu Curtis, Francis Tib- 

bettes, Ruby Zinani, Ann Zanello. 
Second Row: Marie Hasz, Patricia Stefani, Diana Silva, Patricia Brady, Carol Foley, 

Judith Greene, Brenda Pioppi, Elizabeth Wood. 
Front Row: Marcia Hasz, Marilyn Zaval, Mary Po, Mary Bradley, Christine Brigida, 

Judith Thom, Delores Almeida, Carol Connelly. 



ii 



We Believe . . . " 



That Happiness est something that tout le monde would like to have, 
n'est-ce pas ? M. Eldridge 

President Coty of France would declare war on America if he heard our 
French class. J. Northrup 

Recording French prose as well as poetry helped us to correct and improve 
our pronunciation. M. Hasz 

The distraction of those senior girls, has still been too much. Mais, c'est 
la vie. W. McCann 

We'd like to go to gay Paree once French studies are over. Paree sounds 
like quite ze place, so interessante. S. Eastman 

That being a junior in a Senior classe de Francais is a great disadvantage. 
One feels his lack of years. A. Tadgell 

That the three years of High School French will help very much in the 
future. It will help to further our education. A. Guidaboni 

That through French we have learned about the French people. Through 
such an understanding we see now more than ever before they need a 
friend in us, the United States. D. Vacchi 




To dance in France someday would be that "golden opportunity" to show 
great knowledge of the language. J. Weston 

Someday my paintings will be selling in a stall on the L'lle de la Cite a 
Paris. Am I too hopeful ? R. Weaver 



We'd like much more oral French. Could we take it ? 



J. Wood 



That Paysant would turn over in his grave if he heard our tape-recording 
of "En Hiver." P. Owens 

That such outside reading as Les Miserables, Le Petit Chose, and La 
Tulipe Noire gives us a greater comprehension of "le francais." 

S. Roncarati 

That one never misses a language that he cannot speak until he could 
make use of it to his own advantage. C. Branagan 

That three years of French have enabled us to appreciate fine books we 
have read by great French authors. E. Wood 

That French composers such as De Bussy, Gounod, and Chopin are very 
adept at creating a quiet mood. J. Goodwin 

That another year a suggestion for the French Editor might be things we 
do "la francaise." N. Maloni 




LATIN 



i hsrflrtpis 

NEPTUNE Wally Crowell 

HERCULES Ira Carlin 

MERCURY Chris Hussey 

DIANA Karin Engstrom 

AURORA Jackie Weston 

ARGUS Miss Margie Wilbur 

Argus — Sit down, class, let's not waste time. Now where is Hercules ? 
He's never on time. 

Aurora — (yawning, for she's the Goddess of dawn and must arise early) 
Oh, he's chatting with Cleo, the history teacher. 

Argus — Well we'll have to start without him. 

Mercury — (eager) Want me to dash out and find him ? 

Hercules — (slowly approaching his seat) Find who ? 

Argus — It's about time you arrived. Now sit down and let's begin our 
work. Diana, stop chatting. What have you and Aurora got to talk about 
that's so interesting ? 

Diana — Oh, I was telling her about the stag I caught this morning. 

Argus — Mercury, what is the case of the subject ? 

Mercury — Pretty poor, I'd say. (glances around to see if the class is 
laughing at his pun.) 

Argus — We'll have no more of that. Neptune, will you give me the prin- 
ciple parts of the verb, to swim. 

Neptune — Uh - a - er. Speaking of swimming, during my morning swim 
in Plymouth Harbor, I bumped into the queerest fish. He told me . . . 

Hercules — Speaking of fish, I'm thirsty. May I get a drink ? 

Mercury — Me too. I had to run all the way to school today and my throat 
is dry. 

Argus — Allow me to refresh your memory. This is a Latin class not a 
refreshment period. 

Aurora — (whispering to Diana) What did the stag look like that you 
caught. 

Diana — Oh, he was handsome. He . . . 

Argus — Do you mind saving your voices for my questions. Mercury, now 
where did he go ? What are you doing at the pencil sharpener ? 

Mercury — I was sharpen — er, nothing. 

Argus — Hercules, give me the genitive rules. 

Hercules — Certainly (producing a paper) Here they are. 

Argus — I mean, recite them. 

Hercules — uh- The genitive rules ? Let me see. Was that our homelesson? 
It was! Well, er (the dismissal bell abruptly rings.) Whew, saved by the 
bell. I've performed many superhuman feats, but when it comes to un- 
prepared Latin I'm beat. 




DEBATING CLUB 

Back Row: Bernard Barufaldi, Walter McCann, Peter Miller, Phillip Sherman, Douglas 

Beane, James Swanton. 
Middle Row: James Marsh, Ralph Matinzi, Ernestine Zinani, Judith Nunez, Marcia Hasz, 

Diana Youngman, Rita Dietlin, Elliot Segal. 
Front Row: Mr. Roland Holmes, Mary Bradley, Patricia Brady, Carol Foley, Carlton 

Resnick, Robert Miskelly, Jean Caron. 




UNDERSTUDIES 

Treasurer, Howard Benassi; President, Douglas Beane; Advisor, Miss Helen Johnson; 
Vice President, Gerald Goodwin; Secretary, Claire Victoria. 



AFTERMATH 

Ladies and gentlemen you are receiving an on-the-spot report from 
the scene of one of the greatest disasters known to man. In this small 
group before me are the only survivors of a storm lasting for three years. 
The great Mathicane of 1951-54 has ended. Let us move among these sur- 
vivors to see how the storm has affected them. 

James Northrup is making plans for turning 204 into a rhombus 
room. 

John Vancini — a cat who now digs only one kind of rhythm, a 
logarithm. 

Ira Carlin — great hunter, sits contemplating to trap-a-zoid. 

Roger Weaver — planning steps for his new dance — the "rec-tango." 

Phil Owens — eating parallel-o-gram crackers and milk. 

Marie Hasz — working on a formula that will prove that parallel lines 
will meet if they are introduced to each other. 

Aurdey Verkade — acute kid who'll hand you no line — straight or 
curved. 

Wallace Crowell — presently working on triangular ice cream scoops 
and growing rectangular strawberries to make crazy sundaes. 

Fred Simmons — making plans to circumscribe Carver with two 
semicircles. 

Chris Hussey — designing a ship in the shape of a sphere, as it has the 
most area for cargo and passengers. 

Karin Engstrom — our worthy editor-in-chief, who is going around 
in concentric circles within a rectangular maze. 

Claire Connelly — left with a terrible fear of the corollary — a snake 
found in the antarctic. 

Joe Miller — designing a cone-shaped billiard table to be installed in 
Northrup's rhombus room. 

Miss Locklin — left with the fear that she might have another North- 
rup for a pupil. 




ji§ffi^ o "f 




mm 




CHEERLEADERS 

Football and basketball games aren't complete without cheerleaders. 
This year the situation was extended to girls hockey, with very favorable 
results. 

Our four new junior cheerleaders, Barbara Warnsman, Dora Lee 
Roulston, Nancy Maffini, and Ann Alberghini soon proved to be very 
agile and quickly learned the new cheers. Captain Jeanette Brenner and 
the other seniors, Shirley Roncarati, Sylvia Sheehan, and Elizabeth Bobb 
teamed with the juniors to provide the spark and cheers at our games. 
Wearing snappy new uniforms, the girls spent many hours in practice. 




GIRLS' HOCKEY 

The 1954 season opened promisingly on September 14, when a spirited 
squad of 25 girls reported to Coach Marjorie Knight for practice. 

October 14, at Middleboro, Johnson and Verkade each scored a goal for 
P. H. S. Then Johnson scored four goals, Roulston one, and Verkade one to 
give Plymouth the lead. As the game came to a close, Middleboro crept 
up with five goals, but Plymouth stayed ahead, 9-7. 

October 21, was a wonderful day for hockey, although the ground was 
slippery from recent rain. Verkade scored a goal for Plymouth, and 
Bridgewater also scored a goal in the first half. Barufaldi and Verkade 
wrapped up the second half of the game with three goals, giving Plymouth 
a 4-1 victory. 

November 2, Plymouth met Bridgewater at Standish Avenue Field. 
In the first half Roulston scored one goal, and Verkade tallied twice. 
Bridgewater trailed 2-3 at the end of the first half. During the second half 
Johnson added a goal for safe keeping. The game ended with Plymouth 
in charge 4-2. 

November 4, Hanover decided to change Plymouth's record of three 
wins and no losses. Before the half was over, Johnson and Roulston had 
each scored a goal and Verkade had scored three times. Hanover man- 
aged to get one goal. In the second half each goalie must have done well, 
for neither team could break through. Plymouth walked away with 5-1 
victory. 

On Friday, November 6, the weather was threatening. It was very 
cold and windy, but the team came through with a 3-0 victory over Abing- 
ton. Two goals were scored by Verkade, the other by Coombs. 

November 9, the team went to Hanover. Coombs and Johnson tied 
Hanover's two goals in the first and half. During the pile-up, Coach 
Knight gave the team a pep talk which did some good, for Hanover scarcely 
saw the ball in the second half. Plymouth came up with six goals, three 
by Coombs, two by Verkade, and one by Johnson. This 8-2 win gave 
Plymouth its sixth straight victory. 

On November 16, the last and most important game of the season was 
played. Middleboro scored a goal early in the game. Plymouth tied the 
score with a ball off the stick of a Middleboro player. Barufaldi slammed 
a drive to make the score 2-1 in Plymouth's favor. In the second half Mid- 
dleboro tied the score, but with minutes remaining Roulston scored the 
winning goal. This made Plymouth's team undefeated. 

These victories are a tribute to great teamwork, spirit, and most 
important, very able coaching. 




HOCKEY 

Third Row: Myrna Hadaway, Elizabeth Lemieux, Judith Nunez, Jean Freyermuth, Carol 

Melahoures, Jean Drew, Judith Bartlett. 
Second Row: Elizabeth Wood, Paula Coombs, Dora Lee Roulston, Audrey Scagliarini, 

Margaret Whalen, Carolyn Holmes, Rosalind Holmes, Marilyn Zaval. 
Front Row: Fannie Hadaway, Donna Barufaldi, Audrey Verkade, Phyllis Estes, Helen 

Johnson, Gail Borgatti, Ernestine Zinani, Miss Marjorie Knight. 




BASKETBALL 

Third Row: Judith Remick, Joan Whiting, Mary Ryan, Ann Marie Zucchelli, Dora 

Lee Roulston, Carol Melahoures, Claire Mitchell, Myrna Hadaway, Claire Vancini, 

Judith Bartlett. 
Second Row: Diane Youngman, Paula Coombs, Phyllis Estes, Eleanor Bates, Carolyn 

Holmes, Fannie Hadaway, Margaret Whalen, Jean Fryermuth, Ernestine Zinani, 

Judith Nunez, Audrey Scagliarini, Priscilla Smith. 
Front Row: Elizabeth Wood, Shirley Roncarati, Christine Brigida, Donna Barufaldi, 

Audrey Verkade, Helen Johnson, Gail Borgatti, Miss Marjorie Knight. 




FOOTBALL TEAM 

Third Row: Mr. Antone Spath, Charles Tassinari, Ronald Gomes, George Arnold, Harley 
LeCain, Ronald Montanari, Dennis Barrett, Robert Fraccalossi, Donald Fantoni, 
Robert Vandini, George Anderson, David Maffini, Louis Cappella, Mr. Mario Romano. 

Second Row: James Ruffini, Paul Borsari, Robert Gavoni, Jerome Santos, Gerald Pim- 
ental, Robert Vecchi, Peter Parkhurst, Rodman Nickerson, Bernard Andrews, Leonard 
Reggiani. 

Front Row: Robert Deighton, Peter Romano, Donald Vacchi, Wayne Wood, Jack 
Staples, Ralph Resnick, Paul Ferazzi, John Ghidoni, Edward Lopes, Victor Izzo, 
Ronald Fantoni, Ralph Willis. 



FOOTLIGHT ON FOOTBALL 

On September 26, Plymouth High School's veteran grid machine 
started the 1953 season with a bang by swamping Bridgewater, 13-0 at 
Standish Avenue. The Blue and White was never in serious trouble, and 
scored all its points in an action-filled second quarter, when Eddie Lopes 
and Denny Scagliarini broke away for impressive touchdown runs. The 
second half was highlighted by the fine defensive work of both squads. 
Johnny Ghidoni was outstanding for Our victorious squad. 

The Blue and White tangled with the Blue and White of Rockland in a 
hard-fought game on October 3 at Rockland. Although the home team 
was ahead at the half, a fast-moving Plymouth aggregation climbed to a 



convincing 13 to 12 lead in the third quarter. Captain Don Fantoni and 
Bob Fraccalossi each scored on unusual interception and lateral plays, and 
Sid Barrett, with his fine blocking and tackling, was the mainstay of Plym- 
outh's line. Rockland's powerful offensive proved too strong, however, 
and the locals bowed in the fourth quarter, 25 to 13. 

On October 10 at Standish Avenue Field a smooth-running Middleboro 
team moved to a 12 to lead by half-time. Plymouth quickly began to roll 
in the third quarter, as Jerry Santos ran 81 yards for a score on the open- 
ing kick-off. The Blue and White's huge line, sparked by Wayne Wood 
and Bob Vandipi, lived up to .pre-season predictions, and, with the local 
backfield in rare form, Plymouth forged ahead, 13 to 12. Unfortunately 
this lead was short-lived, and at the final whistle the tally was Middleboro 
18, Plymouth 13. 

One of the best games of the year was played on October 17, when 
a strong Whitman ball club invaded the local grid scene. Ralph Willis, 
Dave Maffini and "Feedy" Gomes were largely responsible for keeping the 
visitors out of the Plymouth territory. The only scoring came early 
in the fourth quarter when a short pass clicked for a Whitman touchdown. 
The point was good, and the Red and Black took home a well-deserved 
7 to victory. 

The Big Green of Abington played host to Plymouth on October 24 in 
a game highlighted by some superb precision passing. The local team was 
slow in starting, and the Shiretowners were trailing at half-time, 7 to 12. 
Ronny Montanari sparked Plymouth's offensive in the third quarter, and 
Jack Staples and Vic Izzo teamed frequently to stop the fleet opposing 
backs. Both teams scored again in the second half, and the clock ran out 
as Plymouth was again nearing pay dirt. The scoreboard at the final 
gun read Abington 18, Plymouth 13. 



A powerful Hingham team handed the Blue and White a one-sided white- 
washing on October 31 at Hingham. The score does not create a true pic- 
ture of this game, however. Ronny Fantoni, Ira Carlin, and Charley 
Tassinari helped the local cause considerably, and by capitalizing in several 
important breaks, the home team rolled to a lop-sided 27 to victory. 

On Monday, November 9, a spirited Plymouth team played its heart 
out at Barnstable. The Spathmen, led by Louis Cappella, unleashed a tre- 
mendous aerial attack. Despite the aggressive defensive efforts of Paul 
Ferazzi and Don Vacchi, Barnstable balanced Plymouth's pin-point pas- 
sing by a brilliant display of open-field running, and scored sensational 
runs. Once again the locals emerged on the short end of the score, 27 to 7. 

Winding up the season, Plymouth encountered Lawrence High of Fal- 
mouth on November 14 at Standish Avenue. Sparked by a two-point 
safety by Captain Don Fantoni, the local squad led until a long pass gave 
the Cape team a commanding 6 to 2 halftime lead. Quarterback George 
Anderson, sidelined by injuries, played his first game of the season for 
the Blue and White, and his presence sparked the local team tremen- 
dously. "Satch" Arnold was outstanding defensively in halting several 
Falmouth threats, and, late in the fourth quarter, end Harley LeCain 
alertly jumped on a free ball in Falmouth's end zone to put Plymouth 
ahead for keeps, 9 to 6. 

Looking back upon a disappointing season and an unimpressive record 
of two wins and six losses, we should nevertheless be very proud of our 
1953 football squad. Although seriously hampered by injuries (in one 
game six starters were unable to play), the boys played every opponent 
with fierce determination, and were always a credit to our school. Praise 
without words goes to Captain Donald Fantoni for the tremendous work 
he did in leading an unlucky team through an unlucky season. 





HOOP HIGHLIGHTS 

P. H. S. mighty-mites opened their season on January 22 at Memorial 
Hall by meeting the Alumni. Repeated lay-up plays by the graduates gave 
them a 26 to 20 half-time lead and Phil Carletti and Karl Anderson sparked 
the grads in the last half. At the final buzzer, the Alumni led by a 61 to 49 
score. Sid Barrett and Larry Paul tallied 14 to 13 points respectively, while 
Ronny Ferioli shone in defense. 

The Blue and White journeyed to Braintree for a non-league game 
on January 29. With Butch Merritt and Larry Paul playing great clutch 
basketball, Plymouth was within 5 points of a tie at halftime. Braintree 
then poured on the pressure in the last half, and we bowed 58-49. 

Abington came to Plymouth on January 5 for our first league game. 
Leading 24 to 23 at the half, the Shiretowners proceeded to extend that 
lead into a thrilling 49 to 42 victory. Despite a three minute fist fight, 
our boys remained calm, and Larry Paul threw in 18 points to lead the 
Blue and White to its first win. 

The Maroon and White of Hingham played host to P. H. S. on January 
8, and their fast moving squad rolled to a convincing 67 to 45 triumph. 
Hingham was never in serious trouble and Plymouth would have been lost 
without the fine offensive and defensive efforts of Sid Barrett and Larry 
Paul. 

On January 13, the defending league champions, Wareham High 
School, encountered P. H. S. at Wareham. Despite Larry Paul's outstand- 
ing 14 point contribution, we were no match for Wareham, and the champs 
ran away with the ball game. The scoreboard at the final whistle read 
Wareham 58, Plymouth 39. 

One of the most thrilling games of the year was played on January 
15 when Whitman's "Red Raiders" invaded the local basketball scene. 
The teams matched points throughout the game, and the final buzzer 
found a 40-40 ball game. By scoring 7 points to Whitman's 3 in the over- 
time period, we gained a deserved 47-43 victory. Larry Paul and Don Fan- 
toni paced the Blue and White with several key hoops. 

Plymouth traveled to Middleboro on January 19, and, thanks to Larry 
Paul's 29 point contribution, won a real "squeaker," 68 to 67. With Mid- 
dleboro leading 67 to 66, and 5 seconds of play remaining, Larry swished 
two foul shots to give us the game. 

The Red and White of Barnstable played host to the Blue and White 
on January 22. Strengthened by the addition of Rodman Walley, Coach 
Rogers' men played their hearts out against the powerful team. Larry 
Paul garnered 19 points for P. H. S., but Barnstable finished strong and 
won a 67 to 47 decision. 



Rockland came to Plymouth on January 26 to play a determined Blue 
and White squad. Though the lead changed hands several times, Captain- 
Bobby Fraccalossi broke the game wide open with 8 clutch points in the 
last period to enable Plymouth to hand Rockland a 51 to 44 defeat. 

A fighting Plymouth Squad met Hingham High at Memorial Hall on 
January 29 and scored a surprising upset over the powerful Maroon and 
White. With Larry Paul hooping 20 points and Freddy Simmons break- 
ing up several Hingham offensive plays, Plymouth ran away with the ball 
game, 55 to 42. 

Abington's Big Green upset the local quintet in a thriller played at 
Abington on February 2. P. H. S. was ahead at the three-quarter mark, 
but the opponent's 11 points to our 3 in the final stanza told the story, and 
the home team emerged victorious, 54 to 49. "Butch" Merritt was high 
man for Plymouth with 20 points. 

Plymouth traveled to Whitman on February 5 for another "squeaker." 
Ahead 27-26 at the half, the Blue and White held off the Red and Black to 
gain a 49 to 48 triumph. Butch Merritt and Larry Paul, with 17 and 15 
points respectively, greatly bolstered Plymouth's offensive attack. 

P. H. S. played host to Middleboro High School at Memorial Hall on 
February 9. The scoring was nearly equal in the first half, and we were 
two points down at half-time. The Rogersmen then outscored the Orange 
and Black, 20 to 11, in the third quarter, and, sparked by Sid Barrett with 
21 points, Plymouth rolled to a convincing 56 to 49 victory. 

On February 12 the newly-crowned Old Colony League champions, 
Wareham High School, invaded Plymouth for the year's final meeting 
for the two squads. The Cape team's fast break gave them a 32 to 18 half- 
time lead, and despite the fine defensive efforts of Franny Barrett and 
Howie Benassi, Plymouth lost a 69 to 49 ball game. The highest Blue and 
White scorer was Larry Paul with 9 points. 

An unlucky Rockland squad played host to Plymouth on February 
16. With their offensive attack working extremely well, Coach Rogers' 
charges ran up a 29 to 20 lead. We ran away with the game in the last half, 
and, with Larry hooping 17 points, took home an easy 63 to 46 victory. 
This victory elevated Plymouth into a second-place tie with Hingham in 
the Old Colony League. 

Plymouth closed its regular season on February 18 by entertaining 
a new opponent, Falmouth High School. The Rogersmen jumped to a 
quick 25 to 19 half-time bulge, but Falmouth climbed to within one point 
of a tie at the three-quarter mark. Holding off several powerful Falmouth 
plays, the Blue and White finished its regular season with a narrow 60 to 
58 win. 

Stoughton High School was our opponent in our first South Shore 
Tourney contest, played in West Bridgewater on February 20. The Orange 







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BASKETBALL TEAM 

Fourth Row: Robert Wood, Stewart Gulhang, Frank Gardner, Gerald Harper, Manuel 

Maia. 
Third Row: James Ruffini, Kenneth Hall, David Besegai, David Nunes, John Vancini, 

Daniel Caton, Thomas Pickles. 
Second Row: Don Medara, Peter Romano, Walter McCann, Donald Boudreau, Fred 

Simmons, Howard Benassi, Charles Tassinari, Dennis Barrett, Gerald Pimental, Mr. 

Harold Rogers. 
Front Row: Rodman Wally, Francis Merritt, Francis Barrett, Lawrence Paul, Robert 

Fraccalossi, Donald Fantoni, Donald Taub, Ronald Ferioli. 



and Black were stumped by P. H. S.'s smooth-running basketball machine 
and we held a 33 to 21 halftime lead. Pouring on the pressure in the last 
half, and sparked by Larry Paul and his 25 points, the Blue and White 
won its first Tourney game, turning back the opponents by a 58 to 47 score. 

We journeyed to Randolph on February 22 to play a strong North 
Attleboro five. This game was easily the most impressive and the most 
exciting contest of the entire season. Trailing by 22 points in the third 
quarter, Plymouth turned the seemingly impossible trick of tying the 
game up in the final seconds. With Franny Barrett hooping two vital 
foul shots, we edged N. A., 64 to 62. Larry, with 32 points was outstanding 
for our victorious squad. 

For our third tourney game the Blue and White met troublesome 
Hingham on February 25. Jumping to a narrow 25 to 23 halftime lead, 
P. H. S. consistently held off the Maroon and White's attack and won a 
merited 49 to 48 thriller. With Larry scoring 18 and Charley Tassinari 
hooping 12, we earned the privilege of meeting Sharon for the Division I 
Championship of the South Shore. 

February 27 in Braintree High School were the date and place of the 
championship game with Sharon. With Bobby Fraccalossi and Rodman 
Walley playing fine defensive ball, and with Larry Paul, Charley Tassin- 
ari, and Sid Barrett providing plenty of points, we held a 36 to 26 lead at 
half-time. The Blue and White broke things wide open in the last half, 
and by routing Sharon by a convincing 74 to 51 score, we won the Division 
I Championship of the South Shore. 

Looking back upon a successful season of 13 wins and 7 defeats, we 
can justly be proud of our championship team. Although the players were 
matched physically by nearly every opponent, no foe came close to our 
squad in speed, determination, and spirit. The fine co-operation and zeal 
of our boys and the great work done by Coach Hank Rogers will long be 
remembered at Plymouth High School. 




CROSS COUNTRY 

Top Row: Mr. Harold Rogers, Caslton Resnick, Douglas Beane, Howard Benassi, Hans 

Slade, Peter Miller, Gerald Furtado, Alan Roby, Leo Amiro. 
Middle Row: Thomas Pickles, Ronald LaRocque, Lawrence Paul, Don Medara, Paul 

Douglas, Stewart Gulhang, Rodman Nickerson, James Pina. 
Bottom Row: Donald Fantoni, Robert Vandini, Ira Carlin, John Vancini, Edmund Lopes. 

Richard Waterman, Elliott Segal, Leroy Borgatti. 



CROSS COUNTRY AT P. H. S. 

On October 5 the Plymouth Harriers lost to Rockland. Don Medara 
and Tom Pickles were the only members of the Blue and White who fin- 
ished in the top ten. The final score was 44-18. (Low score wins; 1st place 
one point, 2nd place two points, etc.) 

Don Medara again set the pace on October 15 at Brockton, finishing 
the course with a time of twelve minutes and thirty-eight seconds. Unfor- 
tunately his team-mates were unable to match his speed, and Plymouth 
lost by a score of 35-20. 

On October 19 Don Medara, Tom Pickles, and Leo Amiro led Plym- 
outh to its first victory, over Whitman, coming in first, second, and third 
respectively. Hans Slade, Jimmy Pina, and Peter Miller also finished in 
the top ten. 

October 26 Plymouth travelled to Middleboro for a tri-town meet 
with Middleboro, and Whitman. Again, speedy Don Medara led Plym- 
outh to its second straight victory. The final scores were Plymouth 26, 
Whitman 57, and Middleboro 37. 

On November 2, the Plymouth Harriers ended their regular season 
with a victory over Middleboro. Again Don Medara, one of the finest 
cross-country runners Plymouth has had, came in first, leading his team- 
mates to a 31-24 victory. 

A delegation of seven members of the Plymouth High cross-country 
team travelled to Rockland for the Annual District Meet. Don Medara 
and Leo Amiro were the only Plymouth men to finish in the top ten, but 
the other five men participated with distinction. 

The outlook for next year's cross country team is very bright, as all 
of this year's runners are returning except Johnny Vancini. Despite a 
shortage of veteran harriers, Plymouth did a very fine job. Much credit 
is due to Coach Harold Rogers. 




ROY VITTI 



When Roy became ill, his class mates felt sad because of his own misfortune and 
because Roy is the kind of person a class needs and wants — energetic, helpful, and 
friendly. Roy liked sports and was a good athlete, especially in basketball. He also 
worked part-time and drove his own car, a shiny red Dodge. Those of us who have 
visited Roy have found him in excellent spirits, proving that he is not one to be 
discouraged when things go wrong. When he is fully recovered from his sickness, 
Roy may be sure that his many friends in Plymouth High School will welcome him 
back and do everything they can to help him on to a full and happy future. Let's 
not forget Roy; he hasn't forgotten us. 




tftWHg 



Best wishes to the 
Qraduating Class of 

1954 



C V) 




6 - 8 Court St. 



Congratulations 
of 

LELAND'S 




PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Established 1824 



ROPE - BALER TWINE - BINDER TWINE - TYING TWINE - TWISTED PAPER PRODDGTS 



AIR-CONDITIONING DELCO OIL BURNERS 

HENRY MENGOLI & SON 

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 



Compliments of . . . 



MALAGUTI BROS. 



J^f 



% 



WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

Keepsake Diamonds 
Hamilton — Elgin — Longines 

25 Main Street Plymouth 

COMPLIMENTS OF 
DUTTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

115 Sandwich Street 
PLYMOUTH 

OLDSMOBILE -•- CADILLAC 




Compliments of 




/five cents 
savings bank 

/NCORPORAT£D /8S5 

PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 

The North Plymouth 

Merchants Displaying 

This Seal 




' / ICE CREAM 

Favorably Known for 69 Years and Still in a Class 

By Itself 

"Made For Particular People" 

131 Eliot Street Milton 87, Mass. 

BLuehills 8-7850 
10M> Nelson Street Plymouth, Mass. 

Plymouth 160 


BEST WISHES 
to 

To the Class of 1954 

EDES MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY 

Plymouth, Mass. 


g)elM0 and ' f{eitfi 

CIVIL ENGINEERS and 
SURVEYORS 

Corner of Court and Russell Streets 
Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments of 

OLD COLONY LAUNDRY 

of Plymouth 

Master Launderers — Dry Cleaners 

18 HOWLAND STREET 


Best Wishes 

to 
Senior Class 

EGAN CHEVROLET COMPANY 

120 Sandwich St. Plymouth 

PARTS • SALES • SERVICE 



Compliments of . . . 



The Plymouth National Banh 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 



65^ 




iscte 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



SMITH'S 



PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 



BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 



Telephone 237 




JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Tel. 283 



COMPLIMENTS OF . . . 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY ELECTRIC CO. 



25 Main Street 



Plymouth 



Compliments 
of 



i4 LaJUf&ti D/iuq Stote, 

4 MAIN ST. Wafyiejzn. dgena^ TEL.2055 



SAMOSET GARAGE INC. 



CHRYSLER — PLYMOUTH 

Sales and Service 



We Buy and Sell 
Good Used Cars 



SHIRETOWN MOTORS INC. 



Sales 



i%CPWt> 



Service 



Water Street 



Phone 1407 



Plymouth 



PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

'MODERN STORES FOR MEN AND BOYS" 



PURITAN TAILORING DEPT. 

TAILORS — CLEANERS — FUR REPAIR — FUR STORAGE 



The GREEN THUMB 
GARDEN CENTRE 

"EVERYTHING FOR YOUR GARDEN" 
No. Plymouth -- 1050 -- Rte. 3 


BEST WISHES TO THE 
CLASS OF 1954 

RELIABLE CLEANERS 

28 Sandwich Street Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments of 

FORN SIGN CO. 

315 Court St. No. Plymouth 

Tel. Plymouth 33 


Compliments of . . . 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Stern 
of CARROLL'S CUT - RATE 

47 Main Street Plymouth 


Best Wishes Class of 1954 

from 

Ruth Thayer Glen Churchill 

THE CHILDREN'S SHOP, INC. 

Under New Management 


FINE SHOE REPAIRING 
and NEW SHOES 

C . PAUL 

52 Court Street Plymouth 


Best Wishes To The 
Class of 1954 

JOHN T. BURNS 
INSURANCE CO. 


Compliments of 
STANDISH MOTORS, INC. 

DeSOTO — PLYMOUTH 
Lifetime Guaranteed 
Used Cars 


BEST WISHES 
TO THE CLASS OF 1954 
A FRIEND 


BEST WISHES FOR 
A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 

GREG'S BARBER SHOP 


Compliments of 
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Compliments of 

WARD & BRADY 

SIGNS 


Compliments of 

PRIMO'S SERVICE STATION 

Primo Zucchelli 
Plymouth, Mass. 


ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 

BEAUTY SHOP 

Room 10 Buttner BIdg. 
PLYMOUTH 


Compliments of 

PLYMOUTH ROCK HARDWARE 

62 Court St. Phone 951 


Compliments of 

SEARS, ROEBUCK & CO. 

ORDER OFFICE 



Northeastern University 

BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 

MEN AND WOMEN ADMITTED TO ALL COURSES 

College of Education 

* College of Liberal Arts 

* College of Engineering 

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School of Business (Evening Sessions) 

College of Liberal Arts (Evening Sessions) 

ALL CURRICULA OFFER SOUND EDUCATION FOR LIVING 
AND FOR DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE. 

Registration 

Early in September 

You are cordially invited to visit the University 
to discuss plans for furthering your education. 

'CO-OPERATIVE PLAN SCHOLARSHIPS SELF-HELP OPPORTUNITIES 



FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Director of Admissions 

Boston 15, Massachusetts 

Please send me the following catalog. 

DAY COLLEGES EVENING SCHOOLS 

□ College of Education □ College of Liberal Arts (Evening Sessions) 

□ College of Liberal Arts Q School of Business (Evening Sessions) 

□ College of Engineering 

G College of Business Administration 

Name 

Address 

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COMPLIMENTS OF . . . 

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BOOKS — GREETING CARDS — GIFTS 
TYPEWRITER and ADDING MACHINE SALES and SERVICE 



15 Main Street 
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230 Main Street 
BROCKTON — Tel. 6028 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE CLASS OF 1954 

M & M SPORTING GOODS CO. 



Tel. 1915 



25 Main Street 



PLYMOUTH ROCK 
CLEANERS 

"The Place with Parking Space" 

Water St. - Opp. State Pier 
Phone 1744 



Middishade 
Clothes 



Manhattan. 
Sportswear 



PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

DISTINCTIVE MENSWEAR 
18 MAIN STREET, PLYMOUTH 



TVIallory 
Hats 



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Hosiery 



JACK OTTINO 



ALFRED VOLTA 



OLD COLONY RESTAURANT and DAIRY BAR 

Best Wishes 
from 



the DEIGHTONS 



Compliments of 

BELL SHOPS 

12 Court St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments of . . . 

STODDARD & TALBOT 

"INSURANCE THAT INSURES" 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


Compliment', of . . . 

W. MAINI & CO. 

MASON CONTRACTORS 

73 Standish Avenue Plymouth, Mass. 


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OF 

CAPPANNARI BROS. 


Best Wishes To The 
Class of 1954 

KENT'S BEAUTY SALON 

19 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 
Room 9 Tel. Ply. 794 


Compliments of . . . 

McLELLAN'S 


Compliments of . . . 

LITTLE HAT SHOPPE 

"HATS OF DISTINCTION" 
12 North Street 


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& AUTO STORE 

35 Main St. Tel. 525 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. J. MAROIS 


Compliments of 
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PLYMOUTH GLASS CO. 


JAY'S ARMY and NAVY STORE 

50 COURT STREET 
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Compliments of . . . 

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Best Wishes Class of 1954 
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Compliments of . . . 

Del and Jim Panagoplos, Prop. 
GAMBINI'S LUNCHEONETTE 

52 Main Street Tel. 372 


WOOD'S FISH MARKET, 

RALPH F. GOODWIN, PROP. 

FRESH, SALTED AND SMOKED FISH 

Crabmeat, Scallops, Lobsters, Oysters and Clams 
Telephone 261 Plymouth 


MARTHA'S GIFT & TOY SHOP 

GREETING CARDS— PHONO RECORDS 
TELEVISION — APPLIANCES 

300 Court St. No. Plymouth, Mass. 
Tel. 2109-R 



NOOK FARM DAIRY 




MILK 



and 



CREAM 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Nook Road 



Plymouth 



Telephone PLYMOUTH 1261 



Best Wishes 
to the Senior Class 

PECK - GARRITY 

FUNERAL SERVICE 

Hugh L. Garrity 


Compliments 
of 

AVERY FARMS 


Telephone 1 187-W 

Jim'* Restaurant 

REGULAR DINNERS 
A LA CARTE SERVICE 
Shore Dinners Our Specialty 

5 to 1 1 MAIN ST. Plymouth, Mass. 


1 PlY/AOUJH. /*ass est. i«00 

"Fifty Years of Serving Plymouth" 

61 and 63 Main Street 


To the Class of 1954 
Very Best Wishes 

for A 
Successful Future 

OLD COLONY 
THEATRE 


Success Wishes to 
the Graduates 

GLORIA FOOD STORE 

Court Street Plymouth 


THE HOBSHOLE HOUSE 

An Inn With Early American Charm 

212 Sandwich St. Tel. 1153 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. O'Neill 


Compliments 
of 

BARBIERI'S MARKET 

Jabez Corner Tel. 258 

* 

Quality Meats and Groceries 



Plymouth Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 
Inc. 1882 Fed. 1937 



President 
James R. Chandler 

Vice President 
Harry R. Talbot 



Executive Vice President 
Robert J. Tubbs 

Treasurer and Secretary 
Walder J. Engstrom 



Assistant Treasurers 
A. Lee Roulston Fred C. Brown 

Assistant Secretary 
Mae E. Emond 







At Your Service For 
INSURED SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 

HOME MORTGAGES LOANS PLANS 

Planned for Your Budget 






Pilgrim 
Buick-Pontiac Sales, Inc. 

SALES and SERVICE 

112 Sandwich Street 
Plymouth, Mass. 

Manager Phone: 1090 
WALTER J. McCANN 


BLISS HARDWARE CO. 

MAIN STREET EXT. 

• PLUMBING 
• HEATING 
• HARDWARE 

• PITTSBURG PAINTS 
• SHELL FUEL OILS 

Telephone 825 


Compliments 
of 

SCUDDER COAL & OIL CO. 


H. A. BRADFORD & SONS 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
Specialties 

1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 
Telephone 1298-W 


Real Estate and Insurance 

True Values in Real Estate 

Insurance that pays all just claims 

Dependable Service 

WALTER U. SCHROEDER, 

Realtor 

18 MAIN STREET EXT. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Tel. Office 878, Res. 67 Summer St., 1463-W 


E. CAVICCHI & SONS 

FRUIT and PRODUCE 
296 Court St., Plymouth Tel. 1190 


Compliments of 
MEL'S AUTO REPAIR 

ESSO PRODUCTS 

109 Sandwich St. Plymouth 

MEL DIOZZI, Prop. 


Compliments of 

C. P. WASHBURN CO. 

GRAIN, LUMBER & PLUMBING 



THE ROGERS PRINT 

Complete Printing Service 

20 Middle St. Tel. 165 M 
Plymouth, Mass. 


BERT'S 

PLYMOUTH BEACH 


LINOLEUM TILES 

Tel. 1118 

WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES 

40 COURT ST. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


Compliments of . . . 

Dunlap Service Station 

H. H. RAYMOND, Proprietor 


PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

39 COURT ST. TEL. 1423 
Plumbing — Heating — Electrical Supplies 

MANOMET HARDWARE CO. 

STATE ROAD MAN. 3335 


Compliments of . . . 

BLUEBIRD CAFE 

158 Water Street Plymouth 


PARK AVE. SERVICE STATION 

Socony — Vacuum Products 

Cor. Court and No. Park Ave. 
Phone 1550 


STEVENS THE FLORIST 

STORE PHONE . 278-W 

GREENHOUSE . 278-R 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


Lincoln St. Service Station 

CHARLES CARAFOLI 
Cor. LINCOLN & SANDWICH STS. 
Phone 2009 Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments of . . . 

HATCH 
ELECTRICAL COMPANY, INC. 


TOWN BROOK 
SERVICE STATION 

Mando 

AAA ALA 

International Truck Sales 
and Service 

14 Water Street Plymouth 820-W 


PLYMOUTH ROCK 
BOWLING LANES 

(Automatic Pinsetters) 
BOWLING AT ITS BEST 



ARE YOU AVAILING YOURSELF 

OF THE 

VARIOUS SERVICES 

OF THIS 

FRIENDLY SAVINGS BANK 



PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 

The Friendly Bank" 



BILL PIOPPI'S 
RESTAURANT 

HOME OF FINE FOODS 

60 Court Street 


Zanello Furniture Co. 

Electrical Appliances — Furniture 
Custom Upholstering 

84 Court St. Tel. 1485 


Cape Insurance Agency and 
Cape Travel Agency 

Amedeo V. Sgarzi Orfeo H. Sgarzi 
Enrico Ferrari Henry A. Ferrari 

4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 
Tel. 66 

Book your vacation trip 
in Plymouth 


Compliments of . . . 

GEORGE V. BUTTNER 
STORES 

PLYMOUTH and MARSHFIELD 
Tel. 290 Tel. 590 


Your Search for Furniture 

Is Not Complete 

Until You Have Shopped 

GOGGIN and SON 

11 Court St. 


Compliments of . . . 
BERNARD'S 

LADIES APPAREL 

20 Court St. Plymouth 
Tel. 1635 


GOODING'S 

18 Court Street 
JEWELERS 

Est. 1802 

Diamonds — Gifts — Silver 

Elgin — Gruen — Bulova — Hamilton 

Watches 

Radios — Gifts — Leather Goods — 

Electrical Appliances 

Expert Clock and Watch Repairing 

Tel. 429 Plymouth 18 Court St. 

Credit — Budget — Terms 


1 SWEETSER'S 
GENERAL STORE 

WASHINGTON ST. DUXBURY 
Telephone 15 



The New! The Bigger! 



< 5aJm& 



Plymouth's Fashion Center 



Always the Newest in Fashions 
for Girls of ALL Ages ! 



GENERAL ELECTRIC RCA 

FRIGIDAIRE 

MILLMAN ELECTRIC 

CONTRACTORS and DEALERS 

32 Main St. 14-16 Middle St. 

Telephone 340 



Compliments of . . . 

Ellis Curtain Company 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 
Curtain Manufacturers 



BRENNER AND TASSINARI 

PAINTING CONTRACTORS 
INTERIOR and EXTERIOR 
DECORATING 
PAPER HANGING 
FLOOR SANDING 

and REFINISHING 

— Telephones — 
Plymouth 2045-R or 2045-W 

Fully Insured Workmanship Guaranteed 



WE CLASS OF 1955 



A 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

















Compliments 

to the Class 

of 1954 

from 

WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 

8 North St. — Plymouth 

Some of Our Lines Include 

Stride Rites — Hill and Dale — Bass 
Enna-Jettick — Walk-Over — Foot-Delights 

Bostonians — Penaljo's — Mansfields 

Debs — Coach and Fours — Physical Culture 

Peter Rabbits — Buskens — Cobblers 


PLYMOUTH ROCK GROCERY 

Phone 1198 117 Sandwich Street 

Free Delivery 


Best Wishes 

To the Senior Class 

COLONIAL 

DINER 


Best of Luck 
to the Class of '54 

HOLMES GROCERY 

87 Sandwich Street 


Compliments 

DUNLAP'S OIL & 

BOTTLED GAS SERVICE 

PLYMOUTH 1279 


Compliments of 
Mario's 

Auto Body Shop 

Mario E. Traverso, Proprietor 

112 — 114 Sandwich Street 
Rear Bailey Motor Sales, Inc. 


ARONS FURNITURE CO. 

R 18 Middle St. Tel. Ply. 25 
O Everything - For 
N The - Home 

^ Westinghouse Appliances 







124 Sandwich St. 



Telephone 863 



Congratulations and Good Luck 
in your future careers 



MAURO J. CANEVAZZI 

Plymouth Insurance Agency 
GENERAL INSURANCE 

59 Main Street, Plymouth, Mass. 




5 Court St. 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Compliments of . . . 

TASSY'S 



THE 
BUSINESS STAFF 



E. E. AVERY INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Eighfeen can be a risky age . . . 

. . . and in more ways than one ! Especially in the matter cf 
hospitalization insurance. After you reach 18, the chances are 
you can no longer be covered under your family's insurance ! 

This risk is unnecessary, because for only a few pennies a day 
you can have adequate amounts of hospital and surgical insurance 
through the Individual Hospital Expense Policy. 

You'll be covered at home, away at college — anywhere in the 
world ! Be sure and show this message to your parents — or 
better yet — have them call us now for full details — 166-W. 




Graduates ! 







TO 
THE GRADUATES OF 
1954 



PRINTERS AND LITHOGRAPHERS 




^O 



PRINTERS 
OF THIS PUBLICATION 



7-9 TOWN SQUARE . PLYMOUTH, MASS. . TELS. 775-656 



Compliments of 



THE CLASS OF '54 



SPONSORS 


Mr. and Mrs. Aldeh Alberghini 


Mr. Andivious Hedulus 


Miss Iris E. Albertini 


Mr. Francis R. Holmes 


Mr. and Mrs. John Almeida 


Miss Elizabeth C. Kelly 


Mrs. L. G. Amero 


Koblantz Brothers 


Mrs. Helen M. Bagnall 


Mr. and Mrs. William LaRocque 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank Barrett 


Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Ledo 


Mr. and Mrs. Amedio Barufaldi 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Linton 


Mr. Bernard Barufaldi 


Miss Nellie R. Locklin 


Mr. and Mrs. Elio Barufaldi 


Mrs. Louise Maffini 


Mr. and Mrs. Glen Black 


Mrs. Esther Maloni 


Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Boyer 


Miss Barbara Midkiff 


Mr. and Mrs. David L. Brenner 


Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Mossey 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brenner 


Mr. and Mrs. James W. Northrup 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Brenner 


Mr. Anthony Pioppi 


Mr. and Mrs. Louis Cadorette 


Mr. and Mrs. William Pioppi 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cadose 


Miss Arlene Pirani 


Mr. David Calhoun 


Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Pirani 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Carlin 


Mr. and Mrs. Gunther Robbins 


Mr. and Mrs. Euclid Carreau 


Mr. and Mrs. Ido Ruffini 


Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. Carron 


Mrs. Adelade Saracca 


Child's Chicken Farm 


Mr. and Mrs. William Sgarzi 


Cohen's Furniture Company- 


Mr. and Mrs. John L. Sherman 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank Connelly 


Mr. and Mrs. Gordon B. Simmons 


Mrs. Harriet F. DeFelice 


Staples Restaurant 


Miss Ellen M. Downey 


Mr. and Mrs. Arthur S. Strassel 


Mr. Wilfred A. Doyon 


Mr. and Mrs. James Swanton 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph T. Ferreira 


Miss Agnes Tassinari 


Mr. and Mrs. Arrigo Ferrioli 


Mr. and Mrs. Adrien Verkade 


Gellars — Manomet 


Miss Claire Victoria 


Mr. and Mrs. Roland A. Gibbs 


Mrs. Joseph Viera 


Mrs. Cora Gloyd 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Volta 


Mr. and Mrs. James C. Goodwin 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Weaver 


Miss Ann Guidaboni 


Mr. Roger N. Weaver 


Mr. and Mrs. Arrigo Guidaboni 


Mrs. Weston E. Whiting 


Mr. Stewart A. Gulhang 


Miss Margie E. Wilbur 


Mr. Paul Hache 


Mr. and Mrs. Chester Wood 


Skippy's — 


"A Snack or a Meal"